Thorn (comic strip)

Last updated

Thorn
Author(s) Jeff Smith
Website http://www.boneville.com/
Current status/scheduleConcluded
Launch date1982
End date1986
Syndicate(s) The Lantern
Publisher(s) Ohio State University

Thorn was a college comic strip created by Jeff Smith at the Ohio State University.

Ohio State University public research university in Columbus, Ohio, United States

The Ohio State University, commonly referred to as Ohio State or OSU, is a large public research university in Columbus, Ohio. Founded in 1870 as a land-grant university and the ninth university in Ohio with the Morrill Act of 1862, the university was originally known as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College (Mech). The college began with a focus on training students in various agricultural and mechanical disciplines but it developed into a comprehensive university under the direction of then-Governor Rutherford B. Hayes, and in 1878 the Ohio General Assembly passed a law changing the name to "The Ohio State University". It has since grown into the third-largest university campus in the United States. Along with its main campus in Columbus, Ohio State also operates regional campuses in Lima, Mansfield, Marion, Newark, and Wooster.

Contents

History

In 1982, Jeff Smith enrolled at the Ohio State University to study cartooning. During his time there, he wrote and illustrated Thorn. The eponymous heroine was modeled after his future wife, Vijaya Iyer, who he met at the University. The Bone cousins, Fone Bone and Phoney Bone, were based on his childhood drawings. In 1983, a compilation, currently out of print, titled Thorn: Tales From The Lantern was published, and was limited to 1,000 copies.

In 1986, Smith submitted some strips to newspapers in a failed attempt to get the strip syndicated. According to interviews with Smith, the newspaper syndicates approved of Thorn, but wanted to make several changes, some of which included dropping the Great Red Dragon and Thorn Harvestar, and having the Bone cousins "think out loud" in a style reminiscent of Garfield and Peanuts . Several of the strips formed the basis for its successor, Bone .

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<i>Peanuts</i> Comic strip by Charles M. Schulz

Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday American comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz that ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000, continuing in reruns afterward. Peanuts is among the most popular and influential in the history of comic strips, with 17,897 strips published in all, making it "arguably the longest story ever told by one human being". At its peak in the mid- to late 1960s, Peanuts ran in over 2,600 newspapers, with a readership of around 355 million in 75 countries, and was translated into 21 languages. It helped to cement the four-panel gag strip as the standard in the United States, and together with its merchandise earned Schulz more than $1 billion.

<i>Bone</i> (comics) comic book series by Jeff Smith

Bone is an independently published comic book series, written and illustrated by Jeff Smith, originally serialized in 55 irregularly released issues from 1991 to 2004.

The Art of Bone, published by Dark Horse Books in 2007, reprinted some of the strips, including the ones that were submitted for syndication. In 2008, a second compilation titled Before Bone followed, and was limited to 500 copies.

Characters

The characters featured in Thorn were prototype versions of the Bone characters. They were:

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References