Thornel Schwartz

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Thornel Schwartz Jr., or Thornal Schwartz Jr. (May 29, 1927, Philadelphia - December 30, 1977, Philadelphia) was an American jazz guitarist. He played electric guitar on the recordings of many Philadelphia jazz musicians, especially electronic organ players.

Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz is seen by many as "America's classical music". Since the 1920s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American and European-American musical parentage with a performance orientation. Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music. Intellectuals around the world have hailed jazz as "one of America's original art forms".

Electric guitar electrified guitar; fretted stringed instrument with a neck and body that uses a pickup to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals

An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, slaps or taps the strings. The pickup generally uses electromagnetic induction to create this signal, which being relatively weak is fed into a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.

Schwartz is known as Thornel on recording titles and in standard jazz reference works, but Gary W. Kennedy of The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz notes that Schwartz spelled his own and his father's name "Thornal" on his social security application. [1] Schwartz attended the Landis Institute for piano, but became known as a jazz guitarist starting in the 1950s. He was Freddie Cole's guitarist early in the decade, then worked with Jimmy Smith and Johnny Hammond Smith later in the decade. In the 1960s he recorded with Larry Young (musician), Jimmy Forrest, Charles Earland, Byrdie Green, Sylvia Syms and extensively with Jimmy McGriff, and in the 1970s with Groove Holmes.

Social security action programs of government intended to promote the welfare of the population through assistance measures

Social security is "any government system that provides monetary assistance to people with an inadequate or no income." In the United States, this is usually called welfare or a social safety net, especially when talking about Canada and European countries.

Jimmy Smith (musician) jazz musician

James Oscar Smith was an American jazz musician whose albums often charted on Billboard magazine. He helped popularize the Hammond B-3 organ, creating a link between jazz and 1960s soul music.

Larry Young (musician) American jazz musician

Larry Young was an American jazz organist and occasional pianist. Young pioneered a modal approach to the Hammond B-3. However, he did also play soul jazz, among other styles.

Discography

With Jimmy Forrest

With Jimmy McGriff

<i>A Bag Full of Soul</i> album by Jimmy McGriff

A Bag Full of Soul is an album by American jazz organist Jimmy McGriff featuring performances recorded in 1966 and originally released on the Solid State label.

<i>The Worm</i> (album) album by Jimmy McGriff

The Worm is an album by American jazz organist Jimmy McGriff featuring performances recorded in 1968 and originally released on the Solid State label.

<i>Lets Stay Together</i> (Jimmy McGriff album)

Let's Stay Together is an album by American jazz organist Jimmy McGriff featuring performances recorded in 1966 and 1972 and released on the Groove Merchant label.

With Johnny "Hammond" Smith

<i>All Soul</i> album by Johnny "Hammond" Smith

All Soul is an album by jazz organist Johnny "Hammond" Smith recorded for the New Jazz label in 1959.

<i>That Good Feelin</i> album by Johnny "Hammond" Smith

That Good Feelin' is an album by jazz organist Johnny "Hammond" Smith recorded for the New Jazz label in 1959.

<i>Gettin Up</i> (album) album by Johnny "Hammond" Smith

Gettin' Up is an album by jazz organist Johnny "Hammond" Smith recorded for the Prestige label in 1967.

With Jimmy Smith

<i>A New Sound... A New Star...</i> 1956 studio album by Jimmy Smith

A New Sound... A New Star... is the debut album by American jazz organist Jimmy Smith featuring performances recorded in 1956 and released on the Blue Note label. The album was rereleased on CD combined with Smith's following two LP's A New Sound A New Star: Jimmy Smith at the Organ Volume 2 and The Incredible Jimmy Smith at the Organ.

<i>A New Sound A New Star: Jimmy Smith at the Organ Volume 2</i> album by Jimmy Smith

A New Sound A New Star: Jimmy Smith at the Organ Volume 2 is the second album by American jazz organist Jimmy Smith featuring performances recorded in 1956 and released on the Blue Note label. The album was rereleased on CD combined with Smith's debut LP A New Sound... A New Star... and the following The Incredible Jimmy Smith at the Organ.

<i>The Incredible Jimmy Smith at the Organ</i> 1956 studio album by Jimmy Smith

The Incredible Jimmy Smith is the third album by American jazz organist Jimmy Smith featuring performances recorded in 1956 and released on the Blue Note label. The album was rereleased on CD combined with Smith's previous two LP's A New Sound... A New Star... and A New Sound A New Star: Jimmy Smith at the Organ Volume 2.

With Sylvia Syms

With Larry Young

<i>Testifying</i> (album) album by Larry Young

Testifying is the debut album led by jazz organist Larry Young which was recorded in 1960 and released on the New Jazz label.

<i>Young Blues</i> album by Larry Young

Young Blues is the second album led by jazz organist Larry Young which was recorded in 1960 and released on the New Jazz label.

<i>Groove Street</i> 1962 studio album by Larry Young

Groove Street is an album by jazz organist Larry Young which was recorded in 1962 and released on the Prestige label.

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References

  1. Gary W. Kennedy, "Thornal Schwartz". The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz . 2nd edition, ed. Barry Kernfeld.