Thornhill (Dumfries) railway station

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Thornhill
Location
PlaceThornhill
Area Dumfries and Galloway
Operations
Original company Glasgow, Dumfries and Carlisle Railway
Pre-grouping Glasgow & South Western Railway
Platforms2
History
28 October 1850 [1] Opened
6 December 1965 [1] Closed
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railwaysportal

Thornhill is a closed station. It served the country town of Thornhill in Dumfries and Galloway. The station site is a mile or so from the town. Four miles north of Thornhill is Drumlanrig Castle, home to the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry. The Glasgow and South Western main line rail route between Kilmarnock and Dumfries is forced to make a long detour to the east of Thornhill and through a long tunnel, rather than the more logical route nearer Thornhill town centre and up the Nith Valley, so as not to be seen from the Buccleuch estate. The distance of the station from Thornhill may be one reason that passenger use was light and stopping services ended in 1965. There was formerly a busy livestock market near to the station, which eventually closed around 2001.

Thornhill, Dumfries and Galloway town in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland

Thornhill is a town in the Mid Nithsdale area of Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, south of Sanquhar and north of Dumfries on the main A76 road. Thornhill sits in the Nithsdale valley with the Carsphairn and Scaur range to the west and the Lowther hills to the east. It was initially a small village, planned and built in 1717 on the Queensberry Estate on the road linking Dumfries to Glasgow. The Earl of Queensberry initially named the village 'New Dalgarnock' however the name did not achieve popular approval.

Drumlanrig Castle

Drumlanrig Castle is situated on the Queensberry Estate in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. The category A listed castle is the Dumfriesshire home of the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry.

Contents

Dumfries and Galloway Council are trying to find funding to reopen the station. [2]

Views at the station in 2009

The southbound loop has recently been opened to increase traffic paths on this line. The platforms, signal box and main building still stand at this closed station. Semaphore signalling is still used here.

Railway semaphore signal

Semaphore is one of the earliest forms of fixed railway signals. These signals display their different indications to train drivers by changing the angle of inclination of a pivoted 'arm'. Semaphore signals were patented in the early 1840s by Joseph James Stevens, and soon became the most widely used form of mechanical signal. Designs have altered over the intervening years, and colour light signals have replaced semaphore signals in most countries, but in few they remain in use.

Re-opening

Suggestions have been made for a re-opening of the station. [3]

Despite the positive case for reopening, some local residents opposed the plans in 2009, which involved some property development to pay for new a new station involving platforms to be built slightly north of the present station site.

In October 2016, the local community council in Thornhill released a survey where the village showed overwhelming support for the re-opening of the station. The current plans include building a new station slightly north of the old station.

Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Carronbridge
Line open; station closed
  Glasgow and South Western Railway
Glasgow, Dumfries and Carlisle Railway
  Closeburn
Line open; station closed

See also

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References

Notes

  1. 1 2 Butt 1995, p. 229.
  2. "New Dumfries and Galloway railway station funds pursued" . Retrieved 4 February 2014.
  3. Dumfries & Galloway Standard

Sources

Christopher Vere Awdry is an English author known for his contributions to The Railway Series of books featuring Thomas the Tank Engine, which was started by his father, the Rev. W. Awdry (1911–1997). He has also produced children's books based on a number of other railways, as well as non-fiction articles and books on heritage railways. He was born at Devizes, the family moving to Kings Norton, Birmingham when he was aged 5 months. Awdry was educated at Worksop College, a public school in North Nottinghamshire.

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Coordinates: 55°15′00″N3°44′53″W / 55.2501°N 3.7481°W / 55.2501; -3.7481