Thornton Curtis railway station

Last updated

Thornton Curtis
Location Thornton Curtis, North Lincolnshire
England
Coordinates 53°38′51″N0°19′08″W / 53.6476°N 0.3188°W / 53.6476; -0.3188 Coordinates: 53°38′51″N0°19′08″W / 53.6476°N 0.3188°W / 53.6476; -0.3188
Grid reference TA112181
Platforms2 (probable)
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original company Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway
Key dates
by June 1848Station opened
by November 1848 [1] Station closed, to be replaced by Thornton Abbey station

Thornton Curtis railway station was a temporary structure provided by the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway until it opened Thornton Abbey station 42 chains (840 m) to the north. [2] [3]

Contents

The station was situated south west of College Farm in what in 2015 was still open country with no road access. The line through the station opened on 2 April 1848, with Thornton Curtis opening "a little later". It appeared in Bradshaw from June to November 1848 inclusive. The station's permanent successor first appeared in Bradshaw in August 1849. [4]

By 2015 the only suggestion that a station might ever have existed at the site was a slight widening of the cutting.

Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Goxhill
Line and station open
  Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway
Barton line
  Ulceby
Line and station open

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References

Sources

  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN   978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC   60251199.
  • Dow, George (1985) [1959]. Great Central, Volume One: The Progenitors, 1813-1863. Shepperton: Ian Allan. ISBN   978-0-7110-1468-8. OCLC   60021205.
  • King, Paul K.; Hewins, Dave R. (1989). Scenes from the Past: 5 The Railways around Grimsby, Cleethorpes, Immingham and North-east Lincolnshire. Stockport: Foxline Publishing. ISBN   978-1-870119-04-7.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  • Ludlam, A.J. (1996). Railways to New Holland and the Humber Ferries. Headington: The Oakwood Press. ISBN   978-0-85361-494-4. LP 198.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)