Thornton in Lonsdale

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Thornton in Lonsdale
St Oswald's Church, Thornton in Lonsdale.jpg
St Oswald's Church
North Yorkshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Thornton in Lonsdale
Location within North Yorkshire
Population288 (2011 census) [1]
OS grid reference SD716809
Civil parish
  • Thornton in Lonsdale
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town CARNFORTH
Postcode district LA6
Dialling code 01524
Police North Yorkshire
Fire North Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°13′24″N2°26′11″W / 54.22322°N 2.43638°W / 54.22322; -2.43638 Coordinates: 54°13′24″N2°26′11″W / 54.22322°N 2.43638°W / 54.22322; -2.43638

Thornton in Lonsdale is a village and civil parish in the District of Craven and ceremonial county of North Yorkshire in England. It is very close to the border with Cumbria and Lancashire and is 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Ingleton and 5 miles (8.0 km) south east of Kirkby Lonsdale, and has a population of 308, [2] falling to 288 at the 2011 Census. [1] Its main claims to fame are the Marton Arms pub and St Oswald's Church, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle married his first wife at this church in 1885 and held his reception at The Marton Arms before setting off to Ireland on honeymoon. Doyle's mother resided at nearby Masongill from 1882 to 1917. [3]

Civil parish Territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

Craven Non-metropolitan district in England

Craven is a local government district of North Yorkshire, England centred on the market town of Skipton. In 1974, Craven district was formed as the merger of Skipton urban district, Settle Rural District and most of Skipton Rural District, all in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The population of the Local Authority at the 2011 Census was 55,409. It comprises the upper reaches of Airedale, Wharfedale, Ribblesdale, and includes most of the Aire Gap and Craven Basin.

North Yorkshire County of England

North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan county and the largest ceremonial county in England by area. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber but partly in the region of North East England. The estimated population of North Yorkshire was 602,300 in mid-2016.

Contents

History

The Domesday Book folio 301v includes the arable land in Thornton in Lonsdale Domesday Book folio 301v ms detail.jpg
The Domesday Book folio 301v includes the arable land in Thornton in Lonsdale

In 1086 the Domesday Book listed on folio 301v [4] under Craven Torntun & in Borch, Orm vi curactes ad geld. – that is in Thornton in Lonsdale with Burrow-with-Burrow Orm has circa 720 acres of plough-land to be taxed. This manor belonged to Orm, one of the family of Norse Noblemen who held the most land in Northern England. All estates would also include grazing land but since only arable land was tallied their total area can only be induced.

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

Burrow-with-Burrow civil parish in the English county of Lancashire

Burrow-with-Burrow is a civil parish in the English county of Lancashire. The parish of Burrow-with-Burrow had a population of 191 recorded in the 2001 census, decreasing to 182 at the 2011 Census.

Manor Estate in land to which is incident the right to hold a manorial court

In English law, a manor is an estate in land which includes the right to hold a manorial court. The Lord of the manor, through the manorial court, has jurisdiction over those who live within the lands of the manor. The proper unit of tenure under the feudal system is the fee, on which the manor became established through the process of time, akin to the modern establishment of a "business" upon a freehold site. The manor is nevertheless often described as the basic feudal unit of tenure and is historically connected with the territorial divisions of the march, county, hundred, parish and township.

Historical parish

Because the parish of Thornton in Lonsdale was in the Lonsdale Hundred, a region more ancient than the county of Lancashire, it lay across two counties. A strip down the left side of the parish including Ireby was in Lancashire. The Lancashire area was about 3.7 miles (6 km) long and its width tapered from about 1.2 miles (2 km) to about 330 feet (100 m). [5] However the majority of the parish, including Thornton and Burton in Lonsdale, was in Yorkshire.

Lonsdale Hundred

The Lonsdale Hundred is an historic hundred of Lancashire, England. Although named after the dale or valley of the River Lune, which runs through the city of Lancaster, for centuries it covered most of the northwestern part of Lancashire around Morecambe Bay, including the detached part around Furness. Ironically, only the detached part of North Lonsdale still remains partly within a British parliamentary constituency under the name of Lonsdale. It is part of the Westmorland and Lonsdale constituency.

History of Lancashire

Lancashire is a county of England, in the northwest of the country. The county did not exist in 1086, for the Domesday Book, and was apparently first created in 1182, making it one of the youngest of the traditional counties.

Ireby, Lancashire village in the United Kingdom

Ireby is a small hamlet and civil parish on the edge of Lancashire, England, bordering North Yorkshire. It lies in the City of Lancaster, just inside the recently extended boundaries of the Yorkshire Dales, near the community of Masongill. The parish had a population of 78 according to the 2001 Census. The name means "Town of the Irish Vikings".

Related Research Articles

Westmorland historic county in England

Westmorland is a historic county in north west England. It formed an administrative county between 1889 and 1974, after which the whole county was administered by the new administrative county of Cumbria. In 2013, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Eric Pickles, formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Westmorland.

Blackburn Hundred

Blackburn Hundred is a historic sub-division of the county of Lancashire, in northern England. Its chief town was Blackburn, in the northwest of the hundred. It covered an area similar to modern East Lancashire, including the current districts of Ribble Valley, Pendle, Burnley, Rossendale, Hyndburn, Blackburn with Darwen, and South Ribble.

Flamborough Village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Flamborough is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 4 miles (6 km) north-east of Bridlington town centre on the prominent coastal feature of Flamborough Head.

Ingleton, North Yorkshire village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England

Ingleton is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. The village is 19 miles (30 km) from Kendal and 17 miles (28 km) from Lancaster on the western side of the Pennines. It is 9.3 miles (15 km) from Settle. The River Doe and the River Twiss meet to form the source of the River Greta, a tributary of the River Lune. The village is on the A65 road and at the head of the A687. The B6255 takes the south bank of the River Doe to Ribblehead and Hawes. All that remains of the railway in the village is the landmark Ingleton Viaduct. Arthur Conan Doyle was a regular visitor to the area and was married locally, as his mother lived at Masongill from 1882 to 1917. There is growing evidence to support a claim that the inspiration for the name Sherlock Holmes came from here.

Earby town in Pendle, United Kindom

Earby is a small town and civil parish within the Borough of Pendle in Lancashire, England. It is 5 miles (8 km) north of Colne, 7 miles (11.3 km) south-west of Skipton, and 11 miles (17.7 km) north-east of Burnley. The parish had a population of 4,538 recorded in the 2011 census,

Appletreewick village in United Kingdom

Appletreewick is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England, 12 miles (19 km) north-east of Skipton, 7 miles (11 km) from Skipton railway station and 16 miles (25.7 km) from Leeds Bradford International Airport.

Burton in Lonsdale village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England

Burton in Lonsdale is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England, close to the border with Lancashire. It is in Lonsdale. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 621 decreasing to 579 at the 2011 Census. The parish is approximately 1,500 acres (6 km²) in area and has many farms – dairy, beef and sheep. Little is grown, except grass to feed the animals.

Sutton-under-Whitestonecliffe village in the United Kingdom

Sutton-under-Whitestonecliffe is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, it is situated on the A170 at the foot of Sutton Bank, about three miles east of Thirsk.

Thornton, East Riding of Yorkshire Village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Thornton is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 3.5 miles (5.6 km) south-west of the town of Pocklington and 5 miles (8 km) north-west of the village of Holme-on-Spalding-Moor. It lies just to the north of the Pocklington Canal.

Nafferton Village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Nafferton is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north-east of Driffield town centre and lies just south of the A614 road.

Flaxton, North Yorkshire village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England

Flaxton is a small village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is close to the A64 between York and Malton. The village lies entirely within a Conservation Area as defined by Planning 1990.

Salterforth

Salterforth is a village and civil parish within the Borough of Pendle in Lancashire, England. The population of the Civil Parish at the 2011 census was 637. It lies on the B6383 road that connects Barnoldswick to the A56 road at Kelbrook. The Leeds and Liverpool Canal cuts through the village and there are several narrowboat moorings at Salterforth. The canal footpath provides a picturesque walk to Barnoldswick or to Foulridge in the opposite direction. The village also has a canal side pub, The Anchor Inn along with a lovely children's play area.

West Craven is an area in the east of Lancashire, England in the far northern part of the borough of Pendle. Historically the area was within the ancient county boundaries of Yorkshire and was administered as part of the Skipton Rural District of the West Riding of Yorkshire until 1974.

East Marton village in United Kingdom

East Marton is a village in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 5 miles (8 km) west of the market town of Skipton and is on the A59 road. The Leeds and Liverpool Canal passes through the village on the descent from Foulridge to Leeds. The canal towpath in the village is part of the Pennine Way and the original pack-horse bridge over the canal was transformed into a double-arched bridge when the new A59 road was built on top of it. The canal was fully opened in 1816 with the section through East Marton being started in 1793. Some of the Navvies who died of Smallpox whilst constructing the canal are buried in the churchyard.

Horton, Lancashire village and civil parish in Ribble Valley, Lancashire, UK

Horton, historically known as Horton-in-Craven, is a village and a civil parish in the Ribble Valley district of the English county of Lancashire. Population details are now included in the civil parish of Newsholme. It is near the town of Barnoldswick. Horton has a place of worship, anciently called a chapelry or chapel of ease. For transport, there is the A59 nearby.

Marton, Blackpool Place in Lancashire, United Kingdom

Marton is a settlement on the coastal plain of the Fylde in Lancashire, England, most of which is now part of the seaside town of Blackpool. Marton, which consisted of Great Marton, Little Marton, Marton Fold and The Peel, was originally part of the parish of Poulton-le-Fylde, before the development of Blackpool as a resort.

Craven in the Domesday Book historic region in Yorkshire

The extent of the medieval district of Craven, in the north of England is a matter of debate. The name Craven is either pre-Celtic Britain, Britonnic or Romano-British in origin. However, its usage continued following the ascendancy of the Anglo-Saxons and the Normans – as was demonstrated by its many appearances in the Domesday Book of 1086. Places described as being In Craven in the Domesday Book fell later within the modern county of North Yorkshire, as well as neighbouring areas of West Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cumbria. Usage of Craven in the Domesday Book is, therefore, circumstantial evidence of an extinct, British or Anglo-Saxon kingdom or subnational entity.

References

  1. 1 2 UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Thornton in Lonsdale Parish (1170216787)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  2. Office for National Statistics : Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Craven Retrieved 3 January 2010
  3. "Hound of the Baskervilles may have roamed Yorkshire". The Yorkshire Post. 4 January 2006. Retrieved 28 July 2007.
  4. The National Archives Documents Online, Domesday Book folio 301v
  5. http://maps.familysearch.org/ Family Search, Historical Maps, England Jurisdictions 1851