Thornycroft M-class destroyer

Last updated

HMS Patrician (1916) IWM SP 1654.jpg
Class overview
NameThornycroft M class
Builders Thornycroft
Operators
Built1913–1916
In commission1914–1929
Completed6
General characteristics
Type Destroyer
Displacement985 – 1,070 tons
Length274 ft (83.5 m) o/a
Beam
  • 27 ft 9 in (8.46 m) (Meteor & Mastiff)
  • 27 ft 3 in (8.31 m) (Patrician, Patriot, Rapid & Ready)
Draught10 ft 6 in (3.20 m)
Propulsion
  • Parsons (Meteor & Mastiff) or Brown-Curtis (Patrician, Patriot, Rapid & Ready) steam turbines
  • 26,500  shp (19,800 kW)
  • 2 shafts
Speed35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph)
Range255 tons of oil
Complement78
Armament

The Thornycroft M or Mastiff class were a class of six British destroyers completed for the Royal Navy during 1914–16 for World War I service. They were quite different from the Admiralty-designed ships of the Admiralty Mclass, although based on a basic sketch layout provided by the Admiralty from which J I Thornycroft developed their own design. Like the 'standard' Admiralty M class they had 3 funnels, but the centre funnel was thicker in the Thornycroft ships. The midships 4 in gun was shipped between the 2nd and 3rd funnels. Patriot was fitted to carry a kite balloon.

Contents

Ships

Two ships were ordered (contracted) on 1 February 1913, two more on 26 February 1915 and the last two on 15 May 1915.

Note Thornycroft also built six other 'M' class destroyers for the Royal Navy – Michael, Milbrook, Minion and Munster, all ordered on 20 September 1914, and Nepean and Nereus, both ordered on 20 November 1914; however these were to the Admiralty 'M' design and are included with the article on that large group of destroyers.

Sources

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Thornycroft M class destroyer at Wikimedia Commons

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