Thorolf

Last updated
Thorolf
Gender Male
Language(s) Old Norse
Origin
Meaning Thor's wolf
Region of origin Scandinavia

Thorolf is an Old Norse masculine personal name. It means "Thor's wolf." Notable people with the name include:

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Thor hammer-wielding Nordic god associated with thunder

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Thorolf Kveldulfsson was the oldest son of Kveldulf Bjalfasson and brother of the Norwegian/Icelandic goði and skald Skalla-Grimr. His ancestor Hallbjorn was nicknamed "halftroll", possibly indicating Norwegian-Sami ancestry.

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