Thorp Arch railway station

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Thorp Arch
Former Thorp Arch Railway Station (geograph 5369248).jpg
Cutting and overbridge at northern end of former station
Location Thorp Arch, City of Leeds
England
Coordinates 53°54′46″N1°20′01″W / 53.9129°N 1.3336°W / 53.9129; -1.3336 Coordinates: 53°54′46″N1°20′01″W / 53.9129°N 1.3336°W / 53.9129; -1.3336
Grid reference SE437465
Platforms2
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original company York and North Midland Railway until 1854
Pre-grouping North Eastern Railway 1854-1923
Post-grouping LNER 1923-1948, BR (N.E region) 1948 to closure
Key dates
10 August 1847Opened as Thorp Arch (Boston Spa)
12 June 1961Renamed into Thorp Arch
6 January 1964Closed to passengers
10 August 1964Closed

Thorp Arch railway station (before 12 June 1961 called Thorp Arch (Boston Spa)) was a station in the parish of Wetherby, West Yorkshire, on the Harrogate–Church Fenton line. It opened on 10 August 1847 and served nearby Thorp Arch as well as Boston Spa. The station closed to passengers on 6 January 1964 and completely on 10 August 1964. [1]

Contents

Location and facilities

Thorp Arch station was located north of the level crossing with Church Causeway between the villages of Thorp Arch and Walton.

The station building was designed by George Townsend Andrews in the Gothic revival style. The two-storey stationmaster's house is immediately adjacent. The size of the building and its representative appearance are due to the popularity of nearby Boston Spa, and the latter was the reason for the station called Thorp Arch (Boston Spa) until 1961.

There were two side platforms. North of station was the goods yard with a long loop serving a cattle dock, a short siding through the goods shed, and another siding with an end dock. From the latter, two sidings branched off to the coal drops. The signal box stood on the up side south of the level crossing. [1]

Serving the Royal Ordnance Factory

Construction of the Thorp Arch Royal Ordnance Factory began in February 1940. Initially, all building materials were delivered to Thorp Arch station. On 24 June 1940 new sidings were opened nearer to the factory. The platforms of Thorp Arch station were extended in June 1941 on order to cope with the increasing passenger traffic. Later, a railway loop with four stations was built around the factory, which joined the Harrogate–Church Fenton line by means of two junctions south of Thorp Arch station. [1]

The internal railway and the traffic associated with the Ordnance Factory is described in two articles "The Thorp Arch And The Circular Railway" by Mike Christensen, British Railway Journal, Part 1 in number 65 and part 2 in 66. [2]

Current situation

The station building with the stationmaster's house and the down platform are still existing, the building has only undergone few external alterations and is used as private residence. The up platform is demolished. The goods shed is also preserved, and remains of the coal drops are still in place. [1]

The station building and the goods shed (mistakenly referred to as "engine shed") were listed as Grade II in February 1988. [3] [4]

The trackbed can be followed on a bridleway running north to Wetherby and south across Wharfe Bridge to Newton Kyme. Sustrans Route 665. [5]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Boston Spa is a village and civil parish in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England. Situated 3 miles (5 km) south of Wetherby, Boston Spa is on the south bank of the River Wharfe which separates it from Thorp Arch. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 4,006 rising to 4,079 in the 2011 census.

ROF Thorp Arch was one of sixteen Second World War, UK government-owned Royal Ordnance Factory, which produced munitions by "filling" them. It was a medium-sized filling factory.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Nick Catford (26 May 2017). "Thorp Arch". disused-stations.org.uk.
  2. Christensen, Mike. "Thorp Arch And The Circular Railway. Parts 1 and 2". British Railway Journal (65, 66). ISSN   0265-4105.
  3. Historic England. "Thorp Arch Station House (1313485)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 30 August 2017.
  4. Historic England. "Engine Shed at Thorp Arch Station (1319986)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 30 August 2017.
  5. "SUSTRANS Route 665".
Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Newton Kyme
Line closed; station closed
  Harrogate to Church Fenton Line   Wetherby Racecourse
Line closed; station closed