Thorpe Constantine

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Thorpe Constantine
Former rectory, Thorpe Constantine.jpg
Former rectory
Staffordshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Thorpe Constantine
Location within Staffordshire
OS grid reference SK258089
Civil parish
  • Thorpe Constantine
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town TAMWORTH
Postcode district B79
Dialling code 01827
Police Staffordshire
Fire Staffordshire
Ambulance West Midlands
EU Parliament West Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Staffordshire
52°40′30″N1°37′00″W / 52.675000°N 1.616667°W / 52.675000; -1.616667 Coordinates: 52°40′30″N1°37′00″W / 52.675000°N 1.616667°W / 52.675000; -1.616667

Thorpe Constantine is a small village and civil parish in Staffordshire, England. It lies about 6 miles (10 km) north-east of Tamworth and 6 miles south-west of Measham. The nucleus of the parish is the Thorpe estate.

Civil parish Territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

Tamworth, Staffordshire Place in England

Tamworth is a large market town and borough in Staffordshire, England, 14 miles (23 km) north-east of Birmingham and on the West Coast Mainline. The town adjoins Warwickshire to the south and east, Lichfield to the north and west and local junctions of the M6 Toll motorway. It takes its name from the River Tame, which flows through it. Its resident population (mid-2018 est.) was 76,678.

Measham village in Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom

Measham is a large village in the county of Leicestershire, England, close to its borders with Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Warwickshire. It lies off the A42, 4.5 miles south of Ashby de la Zouch, the closest town, and within the National Forest. Historically in Derbyshire, it lay in an enclave absorbed into Leicestershire in 1897. The name is thought to mean "homestead on the River Mease".

Contents

History

The first part of the name is believed to be the Old Norse word thorp with the meaning outlying farm, indicative of the village's location within the Danelaw. The second element comes from the name of the family that was in possession of the land in the 13th century. [1]

Old Norse North Germanic language

Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th centuries.

Thorp is a Middle English word for a hamlet or small village, either from Old Norse þorp, or from Old English (Anglo-Saxon) þrop. There are many place names in England with the suffix "-thorp" or "-thorpe". Those of Old Norse origin are to be found in Northumberland, County Durham, Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, and Suffolk. Those of Anglo-Saxon origin are to be found in southern England from Worcestershire to Surrey. Care must be taken to distinguish the two forms. Variations of the Anglo-Saxon suffix are "-throp", "-thrope", "-trop" and "-trip".

Danelaw Historical name given to part of England ruled by the Danes

The Danelaw, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. Danelaw contrasts with West Saxon law and Mercian law. The term is first recorded in the early 11th century as Dena lage. Modern historians have extended the term to a geographical designation. The areas that constituted the Danelaw lie in northern and eastern England.

The population of the estate parish is given as 42 in 1848, the land covering 953 acres (386 ha). [2] In 1870 it is given as 54, living in 5 houses. [3]

Governance

The parish of Thorpe Constantine became part of Tamworth Poor Law Union in 1836. In 1894 it became a civil parish within the newly constituted Tamworth Rural District. During the boundary changes of 1934 the civil parish was enlarged with the addition of Statfold and Syerscote, and became part of Lichfield Rural District. [4] [5] [6]

Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 United Kingdom poor relief law

The Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 (PLAA), known widely as the New Poor Law, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed by the Whig government of Earl Grey. It completely replaced earlier legislation based on the Poor Law of 1601 and attempted to fundamentally change the poverty relief system in England and Wales. It resulted from the 1832 Royal Commission into the Operation of the Poor Laws, which included Edwin Chadwick, John Bird Sumner and Nassau William Senior. Chadwick was dissatisfied with the law that resulted from his report. The Act was passed two years after the 1832 Reform Act extended the franchise to middle class men. Some historians have argued that this was a major factor in the PLAA being passed.

Local Government Act 1894 United Kingdom legislation

The Local Government Act 1894 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales outside the County of London. The Act followed the reforms carried out at county level under the Local Government Act 1888. The 1894 legislation introduced elected councils at district and parish level.

Tamworth was a rural district in the English Midlands from 1894 to 1965.

In 1974 it became part of the new non-metropolitan district of Lichfield. The parish council meets jointly with Clifton Campville. [4] [7]

Local Government Act 1972 United Kingdom legislation

The Local Government Act 1972 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed local government in England and Wales on 1 April 1974.

Non-metropolitan district Type of local government district in England

Non-metropolitan districts, or colloquially "shire districts", are a type of local government district in England. As created, they are sub-divisions of non-metropolitan counties in a two-tier arrangement.

A parish council is a civil local authority found in England and is the first tier of local government. They are elected corporate bodies, have variable tax raising powers, and are responsible for areas known as civil parishes, serving in total 16 million people. A parish council serving a town may be called a town council, and a parish council serving a city is styled a city council; these bodies have the same powers, duties and status as a parish council.

Electorally the parish is part of Mease and Tame ward of Lichfield District, [8] and lies within the parliamentary constituency of Tamworth.

Tamworth (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1997 onwards

Tamworth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Christopher Pincher, a Conservative.

Landmarks

Thorpe Hall

The manor house of Thorpe Hall is a privately owned Georgian style country mansion, and a Grade II listed building. [9] [10]

William Ives, a successful Leicestershire vintner, bought Thorpe in 1631. His daughter and co-heir Jane married Richard Inge of Leicester, and the house became the Inge family home. The Inges were a prominent local family, five members of which served as High Sheriff of Staffordshire. Family members were Rectors of Netherseal and of Thorpe Constantine. [11]

Ives had built a three-storey, five-bayed mansion at Thorpe in 1651. In 1790 when another Inge family seat at Drakelow, Derbyshire was abandoned, Thorpe Hall was enlarged and improved. Two three-bayed, two-storeyed wings were added, and the main central block was decorated with balustrading and an entrance porch.

The 1881 census discloses Rev George Inge and his family in residence with a staff of twenty-one. The family remained in occupation until at least 1925. Following the death of Hilda Mary Inge in 1953 the estate passed to the Lillingston family of Localsh. George David Inge-Innes-Lillingston was High Sheriff of Staffordshire in 1966.

The property is now occupied by Hugh Inge-Innes-Lillingston and his wife Catherine.

Church of St Constantine

The parish church, dedicated to St Constantine, is a Grade II listed building. [10]

The church is in the grounds of the Hall, and has been an "estate church" since the 18th century, the parish being owned by the estate. [12] These days it is only occasionally used for services. [13] It is, however, a substantial building, with separate nave and chancel. Extensively rebuilt in 1883, and prior to that in the 18th century, parts of it may go back to the 14th century, including the tower with spire. [12] [14]

The Inge family, owners of the estate, often supplied the rectors too. [12] [15]

Other settlements

The expansion of the civil parish in 1934 incorporated the civil parishes of Statfold and Syerscote, both of which settlements go back to early mediaeval times, though these days must be counted as former settlements.

Statfold

Statfold is an abandoned village, of which little trace now remains, though the listed manor house and church are still extant. Nowadays, the church has the status of a chapel; it is listed Grade II*.

Syerscote

Syerscote 52°39′55″N1°40′20″W / 52.66528°N 1.67222°W / 52.66528; -1.67222 , roughly 3 miles (5 km) north-east of Tamworth and 3 miles west of Thorpe, is a former township of the parish of St Editha, Tamworth. [16] In 1836 it became part of Tamworth Poor Law Union; in 1866 it became an independent civil parish within the union. In 1894 it entered Tamworth Rural District and in 1934 became part of Thorpe Constantine civil parish. [6] In 1848 the population was 46, on 480 acres (190 ha). [17] The farmhouse of Syerscote Manor is listed Grade II. [10]

The name is believed to derive from Old English, with the meaning of Sigeric's cottages. [1] In the Middle Ages Syerscote was a prebend that funded one of 5 canons to the then collegiate Church of St Editha, Tamworth. In 1291 this income was valued at £4 a year. [18] These days Syerscote is within the Church of England parish of St Leonard, Wigginton.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Thorpe Constantine is a civil parish in the district of Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It contains eight buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The parish contains the small village of Thorpe Constantine and the former village of Statfold, and is otherwise rural. The listed buildings consist of two churches, a memorial in a churchyard, two small country houses and associated structures, a farmhouse, and a row of cottages.

References

  1. 1 2 "Key to English Place Names". Institute for Name-Studies. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
  2. Samuel Lewis, ed. (1848). A Topographical Dictionary of England: Thorpe-Constantine (St. Constantine). Institute of Historical Research. pp. 343–346. Retrieved 21 October 2009.
  3. "A Vision of Britain". University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 3 October 2009.
  4. 1 2 "Thorpe Constantine". Online Gazetteer. Staffordshire County Council. 22 April 2009. Archived from the original on 7 March 2012. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
  5. "Statfold". Online Gazetteer. Staffordshire County Council. 22 April 2009. Archived from the original on 7 March 2012. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
  6. 1 2 "Syerscote". Online Gazetteer. Staffordshire County Council. 22 April 2009. Archived from the original on 7 March 2012. Retrieved 30 September 2009.
  7. "Parish clerk contact details". Lichfield District Council. 2009. Retrieved 16 September 2009.
  8. "Register of Electors 2007: Lichfield District". 13 April 2007. Retrieved 22 October 2009.
  9. Historic England. "Thorpe Hall (1374310)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 29 September 2009.
  10. 1 2 3 "Listed buildings of Thorpe Constantine CP" (PDF). Lichfield District Council. Retrieved 1 October 2009.
  11. John Burke (1835). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. 1. London: Henry Colburn. pp. 322–333. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  12. 1 2 3 "St. Constantine's Church, Thorpe Constantine". Mease Valley Churches. Archived from the original on 8 April 2003. Retrieved 3 October 2009.
  13. "Thorpe Constantine". A Church Near You. Church of England. Retrieved 3 October 2009.
  14. Historic England. "Church of St Constantine (1294695)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 3 October 2009.
  15. "GENUKI: Thorpe Constantine". 10 June 2000. Retrieved 3 October 2009.
  16. Samuel Lewis, ed. (1848). A Topographical Dictionary of England: Tamworth (St. Edith). Institute of Historical Research. pp. 297–300. Retrieved 25 October 2009.
  17. Samuel Lewis, ed. (1848). A Topographical Dictionary of England: Syerscote. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 292–294. Retrieved 25 October 2009.
  18. M.W. Greenslade, R B Pugh, ed. (1970). "The College of St. Edith, Tamworth". A History of the County of Stafford. 3. Victoria County History. pp. 309–315. Retrieved 25 October 2009.

Other sources