Thorpe Malsor

Last updated

Thorpe Malsor
Northamptonshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Thorpe Malsor
Thorpe Malsor shown within Northamptonshire
Population 144 (2001 census) [1]
145 (2011 census)
OS grid reference SP8379
Civil parish
  • Thorpe Malsor
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Kettering
Postcode district NN14
Police Northamptonshire
Fire Northamptonshire
Ambulance East Midlands
EU Parliament East Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Northamptonshire
52°22′37″N0°49′41″W / 52.377°N 0.828°W / 52.377; -0.828 Coordinates: 52°22′37″N0°49′41″W / 52.377°N 0.828°W / 52.377; -0.828

Thorpe Malsor is a village and civil parish 2 miles (3 km) west of Kettering. The population at the 2011 Census was 145. [2]

Kettering town in Northamptonshire, England

Kettering is a town in Northamptonshire, England, about 67 miles (108 km) north of London and 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Northampton, on the west side of the River Ise, a tributary of the River Nene. The name means "the place of Ketter's people ".

Contents

History

The Church of England parish church of All Saints was built late in the 13th and early in the 14th centuries. [3] In 1877 the Gothic Revival architect C.C. Rolfe restored the church, [4] with Harry Hems of Exeter undertaking the carving. [3] All Saints parish is now part of a single benefice with the parishes of Broughton, Cransley and Loddington. [5]

Church of England parish church church which acts as the religious centre for the people within the smallest and most basic Church of England administrative region

A parish church in the Church of England is the church which acts as the religious centre for the people within the smallest and most basic Church of England administrative region, the parish – since the 19th century called the ecclesiastical parish to avoid confusion with the civil parish which many towns and villages have.

Gothic Revival architecture architectural movement

Gothic Revival is an architectural movement popular in the Western World that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time. Gothic Revival draws features from the original Gothic style, including decorative patterns, finials, lancet windows, hood moulds and label stops.

Clapton Crabb Rolfe was an English Gothic Revival architect whose practice was based in Oxford.

The village well in the middle of the main street was sunk in 1589. [3] Thorpe Malsor Hall is a Jacobean house that was refenestrated in the 18th century and enlarged in 1817. [3]

Jacobean architecture

The Jacobean style is the second phase of Renaissance architecture in England, following the Elizabethan style. It is named after King James I of England, with whose reign it is associated. At the start of James' reign there was little stylistic break in architecture, as Elizabethan trends continued their development. However his death in 1625 came as a decisive change towards more classical architecture, with Italian influence, was in progress, led by Inigo Jones; the style this began is sometimes called Stuart architecture, or English Baroque.

Ironstone quarrying

Thorpe Malsor sits in the Northamptonshire ironstone field. Between 1913 and 1946, iron ore was quarried from extensive, shallow pits on the north and west sides of the village. These pits were connected to the ironworks north of Kettering, by branch of the narrow gauge Kettering Ironstone Railway. The railway crossed the valley north-east of the village on a substantial viaduct. The branch was removed in 1949. [6]

Iron ore ore rich in iron or the element Fe

Iron ores are rocks and minerals from which metallic iron can be economically extracted. The ores are usually rich in iron oxides and vary in colour from dark grey, bright yellow, or deep purple to rusty red. The iron is usually found in the form of magnetite (Fe
3
O
4
, 72.4% Fe), hematite (Fe
2
O
3
, 69.9% Fe), goethite (FeO(OH), 62.9% Fe), limonite (FeO(OH)·n(H2O), 55% Fe) or siderite (FeCO3, 48.2% Fe).

The Kettering Ironstone Railway was an industrial 3 ft narrow gauge railway that served the ironstone quarries around Kettering.

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References

Further reading

Nikolaus Pevsner German-born British scholar

Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, especially of architecture.

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Penguin Books is a British publishing house. It was co-founded in 1935 by Sir Allen Lane, his brothers Richard and John, as a line of the publishers The Bodley Head, only becoming a separate company the following year. Penguin revolutionised publishing in the 1930s through its inexpensive paperbacks, sold through Woolworths and other high street stores for sixpence, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market. Penguin's success demonstrated that large audiences existed for serious books. Penguin also had a significant impact on public debate in Britain, through its books on British culture, politics, the arts, and science.

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