Thorsness

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Thorsness is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Kristen Joy Thorsness is an American former competitive rower and Olympic gold medalist. She was a member of the American women's eights team that won the gold medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California, the first US women’s crew to win Olympic gold. She grew up in Alaska, and started rowing at the University of Wisconsin. She was named the Big Ten Conference’s rower of the decade and was runner up for Big Ten female athlete of the decade. In addition to the 1984 Olympic team, she was part of three World championship silver medal winning crews and was a member of the 1988 Olympic team. She is a member of the US Rowing Hall of Fame, an inaugural inductee into the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame, and is also a member of the University of Wisconsin Athletics Hall of Fame. She served on the US Rowing board of directors, and has been a US Rowing referee since 2003. After a 25 year career in law, she now teaches.

Leo K. Thorsness United States Air Force Medal of Honor recipient

Leo Keith Thorsness was a Colonel in the United States Air Force who received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Vietnam War. He was awarded the medal for an air engagement on April 19, 1967. He was shot down two weeks later and spent six years in captivity in North Vietnam as a prisoner of war. After his military service, Thorsness served one term in the Washington State Senate.

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A patronymic, or patronym, is a component of a personal name based on the given name of one's father, grandfather, or an earlier male ancestor. A component of a name based on the name of one's mother or a female ancestor is a matronymic. Each is a means of conveying lineage.

Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing or clan names, and shi or lineage names.

When a person assumes the family name of his or her spouse, that name replaces the person's birth surname, which in the case of the wife is called the maiden name, whereas a married name is a family name or surname adopted by a person upon marriage.

A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family. Depending on the culture, all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules.

Given name name typically used to differentiate people from the same family, clan, or other social group who have a common last name

A given name is a part of a person's personal name. It identifies a specific person, and differentiates that person from the other members of a group who have a common surname. The term given name refers to the fact that the name usually is bestowed upon a person, normally to a child by his or her parents at or close to the time of birth. A Christian name, a first name which historically was given at baptism, is now also typically given by the parents at birth.

In several cultures, a middle name is a portion of a personal name that is written between the person's given name and their surname. A person may be given a middle name regardless of whether it's necessary to distinguish them from other people with the same given name and surname. In cultures where a given name is expected to precede the surname, additional names are likely to be placed after the given name and before the surname, and thus called middle names. In English-speaking American culture, that term is often applied to names occupying that position even if the bearer would insist that that name is being mistakenly called a "middle name", and is actually :

Spanish naming customs are historical traditions for naming children practised in Spain. According to these customs, a person's name consists of a given name followed by two family names (surnames). The first surname is usually the father's first surname, and the second the mother's first surname. In recent years, the order of the surnames can be decided at birth. Often, the practice is to use one given name and the first surname only, with the full name being used in legal, formal, and documentary matters, or for disambiguation when the first surname is very common. In these cases, it is common to use only the second surname, as in “Lorca”, "Picasso" or “Zapatero”. This does not affect alphabetization: discussions of "Lorca", the Spanish poet, must be alphabetized in an index under “García Lorca", never "Lorca".

In the Philippines, varying naming customs are observed, whether it is given name first, family name last, a mixture of native conventions with those of neighbouring territories, etc. The most common iteration amongst Filipinos is a blend of the older Spanish system and Anglo-American conventions, where there is a distinction between the "Christian name" from "surname". The construct of having several names in the middle name convention is common to all systems, but to have multiple "first" names and only one middle and last name is a result of the blending of American and Spanish naming customs. The Tagalog language is one of the few national languages in Asia to use the Western name order while formally uses the eastern name order. Thus, the Philippine naming custom is coincidentally identical to the Spanish and Portuguese name customs and to an extent Chinese naming customs.

A formal Irish-language personal name consists of a given name and a surname. Surnames in Irish are generally patronymic in etymology, although they are no longer literal patronyms, as Icelandic names are. The form of a surname varies according to whether its bearer is male or female and in the case of a married woman, whether she chooses to adopt her husband's surname.

A Portuguese name is typically composed of one or two given names, and a number of family names. The first additional names are usually the mother's family surname(s) and the father's family surname(s). For practicality, usually only the last surname is used in formal greetings.

John LeBoutillier American politician

John LeBoutillier is an American political columnist, pundit, and former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York, serving a single two-year term.

Daniel Name list

Daniel is a masculine given name and a surname of Hebrew origin. It means, "God is my judge", and derives from two early biblical figures, primary among them Daniel from the Book of Daniel. It is a common given name for males, and is also used as a surname. It is also the basis for various derived given names and surnames.

Distinguished Eagle Scout Award

The Distinguished Eagle Scout Award (DESA) is a distinguished service award of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). It is awarded to an Eagle Scout for distinguished service in his profession and to his community for a period of at least 25 years after attaining the level of Eagle Scout. Other requirements include significant accomplishment in one's career and a solid record of continued community volunteer involvement. It is one of only two BSA awards given to adults that is dependent upon the recipient's having been awarded Eagle Scout as a youth; the other is the NESA Outstanding Eagle Scout Award (NOESA). Recipients of the DESA are known as Distinguished Eagle Scouts.

The Permanent Representative of Sweden to the United Nations is in charge of the Sweden's diplomatic mission to the United Nations Headquarters in New York City, United States.

The Alaska Sports Hall of Fame honors Alaskan athletes, coaches, contributors, recurring events, and historic moments that have significantly impacted the sporting landscape of Alaska. The Hall was established in 2006 and the first class was inducted in 2007, with new inductees announced in December and added in February. The museum is currently on display at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport.

Li (surname 李) Chinese surname with character 李

Li is the second most common surname in China, behind only Wang. It is one of the most common surnames in the world, shared by 92.76 million people in China, and more than 100 million worldwide. It is the fourth name listed in the Song dynasty classic text Hundred Family Surnames.