Thought eater

Last updated
Thought eater
Thought eater.JPG
First appearance Eldritch Wizardry supplement (1976)

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, the thought eater is a type of fictional monster.

Contents

Publication history

The thought eater first appeared in the Eldritch Wizardry supplement (1976). [1] It appeared in first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the original Monster Manual (1977). [2] It appeared in second edition in The Complete Psionics Handbook (1991), [3] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993). [4] The thought eater appeared for the Planescape setting in A Guide to the Ethereal Plane (1998). [5] It appeared in third edition in the Psionics Handbook , and its 3.5 revision the Expanded Psionics Handbook (2004). [6]

Description

The thought eater is an unintelligent ether dweller attracted by psionic-related energy use.

The thought eater appeared on Geek.com's list of "The most underrated monsters of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons". [7] CJ Miozzi included the thought eater on The Escapist 's list of "The Dumbest Dungeons & Dragons Monsters Ever (And How To Use Them)". [8]

Related Research Articles

Illithid

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, illithids are monstrous humanoid aberrations with psionic powers. In a typical Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting, they live in the moist caverns and cities of the enormous Underdark. Illithids believe themselves to be the dominant species of the multiverse and use other intelligent creatures as thralls, slaves, and chattel. Illithids are well known for making thralls out of other intelligent creatures, as well as feasting on their brains.

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, demons are the most widespread race of fiends. The demons are chaotic evil by nature, and are native to the Abyss. Demons have no true rulers, though powerful demon lords are able to gain enough power and influence to gain control over sizable armies of demonic creatures.

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, devils are a powerful group of monsters used as a high-level challenge for players of the game. Devils are Lawful Evil in alignment and originate from the Nine Hells of Baator. True to their Lawful Evil alignment, devils are locked in a strict and brutal hierarchy. At the top of the hierarchy are the supreme Archdevils or Lords of the Nine, who are the rulers of the different regions of Baator. Devils often see the various worlds in the D&D metacosmos as tools to use for their own ends, including prosecuting the Blood War, a millennia-long war between the devils and their arch-enemies, demons.

Lizardfolk fictional race in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game

Lizardfolk are a fictional humanoid species in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, having appeared in every version of the game to date.

Bruce Cordell novelist and author of roleplaying games from the United States

Bruce Robert Cordell is an American author of roleplaying games and fantasy novels. He has worked on Dungeons & Dragons games for Wizards of the Coast. He won the Origins Award for Return to the Tomb of Horrors and has also won several ENnies. He lives in Seattle.

Dwarf (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) people from Dungeons & Dragons

A dwarf, in the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy roleplaying game, is a humanoid race, one of the primary races available for player characters. The idea for the D&D dwarf comes from European mythologies and J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings (1954-1955), and has been used in D&D and its predecessor Chainmail since the early 1970s. Variations from the standard dwarf archetype of a short and stout demihuman are commonly called subraces, of which there are more than a dozen across many different rule sets and campaign settings.

Balor (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) fictional entity in Dungeons & Dragons

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, a balor is one of the most powerful types of tanar'ri demons. Of all the inhabitants of the Abyss, balors are second in power only to the demon lords, klurichirs, and myrmyxicus. In first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, balors were known as "type VI demons".

Glabrezu

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, the glabrezu is one of the most powerful types of demon. In first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, glabrezu were known as type III demons. In second edition AD&D, the name "type III demon" was changed to "glabrezu".

Goblin (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) race of monsters in "Dungeons & Dragons"

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, goblins are a common and fairly weak race of evil humanoid monsters. Goblins are non-human monsters that low-level player characters often face in combat.

Minotaur (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) creature in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, minotaurs are a race of monstrous humanoids. Based upon the minotaur of Greek myth, they resemble bull-human hybrids. Many minotaurs worship the demon lord Baphomet.

Succubus (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) Creature in the role playing game Dungeons and Dragons

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, a succubus is a female demon, or, under 4th edition rules, a devil. The male equivalent is an incubus.

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, undead is a classification of monsters that can be encountered by player characters. Undead creatures are most often once-living creatures, which have been animated by spiritual or supernatural forces.

Giant (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) creature in "Dungeons & Dragons"

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, giants are a collection of very large humanoid creatures based on giants of legend, or in third edition, a "creature type".

Lich (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) undead creature in "Dungeons & Dragons"

The lich is an undead creature found in the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game. Liches are spellcasters who seek to defy death by magical means.

Skeleton (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) undead creature in "Dungeons & Dragons"

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, the skeleton is an undead creature. In the third edition of the game, a skeleton's statistics are usually created by applying a template to those of another creature.

Titan (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) enormous, powerful, and godly outsider in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, a titan is an enormous, powerful, and godly outsider. Though titans are supposedly of both chaotic good and chaotic evil alignments, the majority of them seem to be good. In appearance, a good titan resembles an enormous humanoid, with perfect beauty and strength. They are hardy and muscular, but nonetheless extremely handsome/beautiful. Every aspect of them is also perfect. Based on the Titans of the Greek and Roman pantheons, they dress themselves in traditional Greek garb such as togas and loincloths. They also dress themselves in rare and valuable jewellery to make themselves seem even more overpowering and beautiful.

<i>Eldritch Wizardry</i> OD&D extension by Gary Gygax

Eldritch Wizardry is a supplementary rulebook by Gary Gygax and Brian Blume, written for the original edition of the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game, which included a number of significant additions to the core game. Its product designation is TSR 2005.

The Wand of Orcus is a fictional magical weapon described in various Dungeons & Dragons media. Because of the popularity of Orcus as a villain within the Dungeons & Dragons universe, many different authors have written materials describing artifacts created by or associated with the character. The Wand of Orcus is consistently the most important and most described of these artifacts. Screen Rant has noted that "[t]he weapon that Orcus wields in battle is almost as famous as the demon lord himself".

Demilich (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) creature in role-playing games

The demilich is a type of lich found in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game.

Monsters are an important element of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Since the game's first edition in 1974, a bestiary was included along other game manuals, first called Monsters & Treasure and now commonly called the Monster Manual. Described as an "essential" part of Dungeons & Dragons, the game's monsters have become notable in their own right, influencing fields such as video games and fiction, as well as popular culture.

References

  1. Gygax, Gary; Blume, Brian (1976), Eldritch Wizardry (1 ed.), Lake Geneva, WI: TSR
  2. Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual (TSR, 1977)
  3. Winter, Steve. The Complete Psionics Handbook (TSR, 1991)
  4. Stewart, Doug, ed. Monstrous Manual (TSR, 1993)
  5. Cordell, Bruce R. A Guide to the Ethereal Plane (TSR, 1998).
  6. Cordell, Bruce R. Expanded Psionics Handbook (Wizards of the Coast, 2004)
  7. "The most underrated monsters of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons - Geek.com". Geek.com. 27 June 2016. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  8. "The Dumbest Dungeons & Dragons Monsters Ever (And How To Use Them)". Escapistmagazine.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.