Thousand (comics)

Last updated
The Thousand
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Tangled Web of Spider-Man #1
Created by Garth Ennis, John McCrea and James Hodgkins
In-story information
Full name Carl King
Team affiliations None
Notable aliases Jess Patton
Abilities Body is composed of one-thousand spiders capable of devouring the innards of humans and using their leftover skin like a suit
Super-strength
Venomous bite
Capable of adhering to surfaces

The Thousand is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

An American comic book is a thin periodical, typically 32 pages, containing comics content. While the form originated in 1933, American comic books first gained popularity after the 1938 publication of Action Comics, which included the debut of the superhero Superman. This was followed by a superhero boom that lasted until the end of World War II. After the war, while superheroes were marginalized, the comic book industry rapidly expanded, and genres such as horror, crime, science fiction, and romance became popular. The 1950s saw a gradual decline, due to a shift away from print media in the wake of television and the impact of the Comics Code Authority. The late 1950s and the 1960s saw a superhero revival, and superheroes remain the dominant character archetype in the 21st century.

Marvel Comics company that publishes comic books and related media

Marvel Comics is the brand name and primary imprint of Marvel Worldwide Inc., formerly Marvel Publishing, Inc. and Marvel Comics Group, a publisher of American comic books and related media. In 2009, The Walt Disney Company acquired Marvel Entertainment, Marvel Worldwide's parent company.

Contents

Publication History

Created in combination by Garth Ennis, John McCrea and James Hodgkins, the Thousand first appears in Tangled Web of Spider-Man #1.

Garth Ennis Irish comics writer

Garth Ennis is a Northern Irish-born naturalized American comics writer, best known for the Vertigo series Preacher with artist Steve Dillon and his nine-year run on Marvel Comics' Punisher franchise. He has collaborated with artists such as Dillon and Glenn Fabry on Preacher, John McCrea on Hitman, Marc Silvestri on The Darkness, and Carlos Ezquerra on both Preacher and Hitman.

John McCrea (comics) Comic artist

John McCrea is a comic book artist best known for his collaborations with writer Garth Ennis.

Originally a man known as Carl King, King became the Thousand when he consumed the radioactive spider that gave Spider-Man his powers, which resulted in his transformation from a human being into a hive-minded swarm of a thousand spiders. [1]

A group mind, hive mind, group ego, mind coalescence, or gestalt intelligence in science fiction is a plot device in which multiple minds, or consciousnesses, are linked into a single, collective consciousness or intelligence. Its use in literature goes back at least as far as Olaf Stapledon's science fiction novel Last and First Men (1930). A group mind might be formed by any fictional plot device that facilitates brain to brain communication, such as telepathy.

Fictional character biography

A bully as a child, King's favorite target of abuse was classmate Peter Parker who he has tormented in elementary school. [2] When Aunt May heard of this, she complained to the principal about Carl King. No student would testify as a witness. When it came to Peter Parker's days at Midtown High School, Carl King continued to torment Parker by forcing him to write his papers and then beating him up if his grades weren't good. [3]

Spider-Man Fictional Marvel superhero

Spider-Man is a fictional superhero created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko. He first appeared in the anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 in the Silver Age of Comic Books. He appears in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, as well as in a number of movies, television shows, and video game adaptations set in the Marvel Universe. In the stories, Spider-Man is the alias of Peter Parker, an orphan raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben in New York City after his parents Richard and Mary Parker were killed in a plane crash. Lee and Ditko had the character deal with the struggles of adolescence and financial issues, and accompanied him with many supporting characters, such as J. Jonah Jameson, Flash Thompson, Harry Osborn, romantic interests Gwen Stacy and Mary Jane Watson, and foes such as Doctor Octopus, Green Goblin and Venom. His origin story has him acquiring spider-related abilities after a bite from a radioactive spider; these include clinging to surfaces, shooting spider-webs from wrist-mounted devices, and detecting danger with his "spider-sense".

Aunt May comic book character

May Parker, commonly known as Aunt May, is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, commonly in association with the superhero Spider-Man. Created by writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko, the character made her first appearance in Amazing Fantasy No. 15.

Midtown High School is a fictional school appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The school is depicted as being located in Forest Hills. It is commonly depicted as the high school of Peter Parker, Flash Thompson, and Liz Allan in comic books and other media.

Wanting to gain superpowers like Peter, King returns to the science exhibit and, finding the now dead irradiated spider, kept for study, eats it. For several days, King shows no sign of mutation, until one morning he discovers his body is composed of spiders. Discovering his power to consume the innards of other human beings and use their skin like a suit after accidentally doing so to his mother, King proceeds to do the same to his father and, wanting to gain mastery of his new abilities, begins to consume and take over the bodies of various people, including his girlfriend, most of them homeless vagrants and children. [1]

Years later, King becomes jealous of the fame and glory Peter Parker has as Spider-Man following his fight against Rhino and decides to kill him. [2] Murdering and assuming the identity of Daily Bugle employee Jess Patton, King finds Peter and, pretending to be Patton, spins a lie about being broke, alcoholic and homeless after being rejected by a boyfriend. Managing to gain Peter's pity, King is taken to his apartment by him, where he reveals his true identity and attacks, managing to beat Peter in seconds after he changes into his Spider-Man outfit, paralyzing him with his venomous bite and, putting him in restraints, takes him back to his apartment where he plans to devour him. [3]

Rhino (comics) Marvel Comics supervillain

Rhino is a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Although more than one character has assumed the identity of Rhino, the first of these, and the one primarily associated with that identity, is Aleksei Sytsevich, who was created by writer Stan Lee and artist John Romita Sr., and first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man #41.

<i>Daily Bugle</i> fictional New York City tabloid newspaper

The Daily Bugle is a fictional New York City tabloid newspaper appearing as a plot element in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The Daily Bugle is a regular fixture in the Marvel Universe, most prominently in Spider-Man comic titles and their derivative media. The newspaper first appeared in Fantastic Four #2, and its offices in The Amazing Spider-Man #1. The Daily Bugle was first featured on film in the 2002 film Spider-Man. The fictional newspaper is meant to be a pastiche of both the New York Daily News and the New York Post, two popular real-life New York City tabloids.

Before King manages to eat Peter, the latter's landlord Mr. Ambrose, enters the room. Not wanting to have a witness to his existence, King swarms over Ambrose and kills him. After taking over Ambrose's body, King reveals his full origin to Spider-Man, in a lengthy speech. As King rants, the venom that had paralyzed him wears off and Spider-Man attacks him. Trading insults as they fight, King calls Spider-Man the same spineless worm he knew as a child, while Spider-Man calls King a friendless bully afraid of women. Gaining to the upper-hand in the fight, King knocks Spider-Man to the floor and prepares to deliver the killing blow to him. Ignoring the warnings given to him by Spider-Man, King attempts to strike, but instead hits a high-voltage electrical generator, which incinerates practically all of the spiders composing him. Believing King to be dead, Spider-Man leaves the scene, not noticing that one of the spiders that composed his enemy survived electrocution. Seconds after vowing vengeance on Spider-Man, the last piece of King is stepped on by an oblivious passerby. [1]

Powers and Abilities

The Thousand was actually 1,000 spiders that made up Carl King's consciousness. They can enter the mouth of their host consuming their innards (usually by liquifying and drinking the brain, then devouring the organs and skeleton of the person) leaving the skin intact so that the Thousand can appear as a normal human being. With each host that has been consumed, the Thousand became stronger even to the point where it was as strong as Spider-Man. In addition, the Thousand's host can cling to walls, paralyze a victim with its bite, and hideously contort its body. In the event that the host was destroyed, the Thousand can find a new host.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Garth Ennis (w), John McCrea (p), James Hodgkins (i). "The Coming Of The Thousand (Part 3)"Tangled Web of Spider-Man 3(August 2001),Marvel Comics
  2. 1 2 Garth Ennis (w), John McCrea (p), James Hodgkins (i). "The Coming Of The Thousand (Part 1)"Tangled Web of Spider-Man 1(June 2001),Marvel Comics
  3. 1 2 Garth Ennis (w), John McCrea (p), James Hodgkins (i). "The Coming Of The Thousand (Part 2)"Tangled Web of Spider-Man 2(July 2001),Marvel Comics