Three Figures

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Three Figures
Three Figures, Portland, Oregon.jpg
The sculpture in 2015
Three Figures
Artist Mark Bulwinkle
Year1991–1992 (1991–1992)
TypeSculpture
Medium
Location Portland, Oregon, United States
Coordinates 45°31′48″N122°39′08″W / 45.53001°N 122.65221°W / 45.53001; -122.65221 Coordinates: 45°31′48″N122°39′08″W / 45.53001°N 122.65221°W / 45.53001; -122.65221
OwnerCity of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council

Three Figures is an outdoor sculpture by American artist Mark Bulwinkle, located at Northeast 13th Avenue and Northeast Holladay Street in Portland, Oregon's Lloyd District. The installation includes three bronze or steel figures, [1] created during 1991–1992, each measuring between 8 feet (2.4 m) and 10 feet (3.0 m) tall. Originally installed at AVIA's corporate headquarters, the figures were donated to the City of Portland and relocated to their current location "to appear to be enjoying the green space". [2] Three Figures is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council. [3]

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References

  1. "Three Figures, (sculpture)". Smithsonian Institution . Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  2. "Public Art Search: Three Figures". Regional Arts & Culture Council . Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  3. "Three Figures, 1992". cultureNOW. Retrieved November 16, 2014.