Three Forks, British Columbia

Last updated
Three Forks
Canada British Columbia location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Three Forks
Location of Three Forks in British Columbia
Coordinates: 50°01′00″N117°17′00″W / 50.01667°N 117.28333°W / 50.01667; -117.28333 Coordinates: 50°01′00″N117°17′00″W / 50.01667°N 117.28333°W / 50.01667; -117.28333
CountryFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Province Flag of British Columbia.svg  British Columbia
Region Slocan Valley, West Kootenay
Regional district Central Kootenay
Area codes 250, 778, 236, & 672
Highways BC-31A.svg Hwy 31A

Three Forks is a ghost town at the junction of Carpenter, Seaton, and Kane creeks in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. [1] This former mining community, on BC Highway 31A, is by road about 8 kilometres (5 mi) east of New Denver and 38 kilometres (24 mi) west of Kaslo.

Contents

Strategic location

Well positioned as a stopover for horse packtrains carrying ore from the surrounding mines to New Denver, a number of entrepreneurs attempted to secure this land but each failed. In October 1891, John A. Watson sought 129 hectares (320 acres). Later that year, Billy Lynch laid out a townsite. In January 1892, Eli Carpenter filed his notice for the same ground, but by that time the government had reserved all Crown land within ten miles of Slocan Lake for agricultural purposes. In June 1892, Charles Hugonin and Eric Conway Carpenter preempted 65 hectares (160 acres) for agriculture, but instead erected a hotel. Having leased out the venture, the pair built a further hotel the next year. They sold their land interest to Frank S. Barnard and John A. Mara, who later failed to secure a Crown grant, because a preexisting mining claim encumbered the property. [2]

Railway

In October 1894, the rail head of the Nakusp and Slocan Railway (N&S), a Canadian Pacific Railway subsidiary, arrived. Hundreds of tons of ore, which had been hauled along trails from mines awaited to be shipped out. [3] Infrastructure included a turntable and two-stall roundhouse. [4]

In late 1895, Sandon became the terminal for two railways, when the N&S was extended from Three Forks, and the Kaslo and Slocan Railway (K&S), a Great Northern Railway subsidiary, was completed from Kaslo. Payne Bluff/Bailey's siding on the K&S, over 800 feet (244 m) above, was connected to Three Forks by a trail. [5]

Passenger travel northeast of Rosebery ceased in 1933. Damage from the 1955 floods on Carpenter Creek ended all traffic east of Denver Canyon. [6]

Train Timetables (Regular stop or Flag stop)
Year18981907191419291932
Ref. [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]
TypeRegularRegularRegularRegularRegular

Early community

Apart from the hotel, a general store, furnishing store, and livery opened in 1892. [12] A post office operated 1893–1909, 1911–1917, and in 1921. In March 1894, a townsite was laid out, [2] with the 240 lots occupying three benches. [12] A police constable was in residence. [13] The next month, a Crown grant was issued, likely influenced by the coming railway. When a forest fire destroyed all the buildings in July, [2] far more were erected over the following months. [14] The Three Forks Slocan Prospector newspaper was published December 1894–April 1895. [15] [16] By January 1895, a restaurant, laundry, bathhouse, drugstore, two butchers, three general stores, hotels, and a jail existed. [15] At the climax of prosperity, the Brunswick, Black's, Richelieu, Wilmington, Slocan, and Miner's Exchange hotels operated. [17] After the N&S extension opened, Sandon grew at the expense of Three Forks. [2] By 1900, many buildings were empty. [18] By 1910, only a hotel and general store existed. [19] By 1918, only the store remained [20] but likely closed a few years later with the post office.

Present site

An interpretive sign stands in a clearing, but scattered remnants are hidden beneath the surrounding undergrowth. [18] The Rosebery to Three Forks Regional Trail (Galena Trail) intersects the site. [21] A flower shop and associated farm operate at the road junction. [22]

Television

Three Forks was featured on the historical television series Gold Trails and Ghost Towns, Season 3, Episode 5.

Footnotes

  1. "Three Forks (locality)". BC Geographical Names.
    "Carpenter Creek (creek)". BC Geographical Names.
    "Seaton Creek (creek)". BC Geographical Names.
    "Kane Creek (creek)". BC Geographical Names.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Nelson Star, 7 Sep 2017". www.nelsonstar.com.
  3. "Nakusp Ledge, 1 Nov 1894". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  4. Turner & Wilkie 1993, p. 32.
  5. Turner & Wilkie 1993, p. 58.
  6. "Province, 28 Sep 1980". www.newspapers.com. p. 30. Passenger service between the Slocan and Kootenay Lakes ceased in 1933, and freight service was permanently halted by the floods of 1955.
  7. "1898 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 32 (14).
  8. "1907 timetable" (PDF). www.traingeek.ca. p. 44.
  9. Turner & Wilkie 1993, p. 232.
  10. "1929 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 30 (TT116).
  11. "1932 timetable". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 470 (TT15).
  12. 1 2 West Kootenay: pioneer years , p. 101, at Google Books
  13. West Kootenay: pioneer years , p. 104, at Google Books
  14. "Kootenay Mail, 15 Dec 1894". www.library.ubc.ca. p. 1.
  15. 1 2 West Kootenay: pioneer years , p. 105, at Google Books
  16. West Kootenay: pioneer years , p. 108, at Google Books
  17. "1897 BC Directory". www.bccd.vpl.ca.
  18. 1 2 "Three Forks/Alamo". www.ghosttownpix.com.
  19. "1910 BC Directory". www.bccd.vpl.ca.
  20. "1918 BC Directory". www.bccd.vpl.ca.
  21. "N&S Railway, GalenaTrail". www.trailsbc.ca.
  22. "Silver Sage Flora". www.centralkootenayfood.ca.

Related Research Articles

The Columbia and Kootenay Railway (C&KR) was a historic railway operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia. This 25-mile (40 km) route, beside the unnavigable Kootenay River, linked Nelson on the west arm of Kootenay Lake with Robson at the confluence of the Kootenay River and the Columbia River near Castlegar.

Kaslo and Slocan Railway

The Kaslo and Slocan Railway (K&S) is a historic railway that operated in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The K&S connected Kaslo and Sandon. Initially a narrow-gauge railway, the line was later rebuilt to standard gauge.

The Nakusp and Slocan Railway (N&S) is a historic Canadian railway that operated in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The N&S initially connected Nakusp and Three Forks but soon extended to Sandon.

New Denver Village in British Columbia, Canada

New Denver is at the mouth of Carpenter Creek, on the east shore of Slocan Lake, in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The village is 47 kilometres (29 mi) west of Kaslo on Highway 31A, and 47 kilometres (29 mi) southeast of Nakusp and 32 kilometres (20 mi) northeast of Slocan on Highway 6.

Sandon, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Sandon is in the foothills of the Selkirk Mountains in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The near ghost town lies off BC Highway 31A, and is at the confluence of Sandon Creek into Carpenter Creek. By road, the place is about 14 kilometres (9 mi) east of New Denver and 43 kilometres (27 mi) west of Kaslo.

Eholt is in the Boundary Country region of south central British Columbia. This ghost town, on BC Highway 3, is by road about 27 kilometres (17 mi) northwest of Grand Forks and 14 kilometres (9 mi) northeast of Greenwood.

Silverton, British Columbia Village in British Columbia, Canada

Silverton is a village about 5 kilometres (3 mi) south of New Denver in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing is at the mouth of Silverton Creek on the eastern shore of Slocan Lake. The locality, on BC Highway 6 at the junction of BC Highway 31A, is about 95 kilometres (59 mi) by road north of Castlegar and 155 kilometres (96 mi) by road and ferry south of Revelstoke.

Slocan, British Columbia Village in British Columbia, Canada

The Village of Slocan is in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing and ferry terminal is at the mouth of Springer Creek, at the foot of Slocan Lake. The locality, on BC Highway 6 is about 69 kilometres (43 mi) by road north of Castlegar and 183 kilometres (114 mi) by road and ferry south of Revelstoke.

Ainsworth Hot Springs Unincorporated Community in British Columbia, Canada

Ainsworth Hot Springs, previously named Ainsworth, is a historic village on Kootenay Lake in British Columbia, Canada and has a population of 20. Founded on May 31, 1883, it is the oldest surviving community on Kootenay Lake. Ainsworth Hot Springs is located on Highway 31, 11 miles (18 km) north of Balfour and 12 miles (19 km) south of Kaslo, British Columbia. Today, Ainsworth Hot Springs and the Cody Caves are a popular destination for tourists and spelunkers.

Slocan Valley

The Slocan Valley is a valley in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia.

Albert Canyon Railway point in British Columbia, Canada

Albert Canyon is about 32 kilometres (20 mi) east of Revelstoke in southeastern British Columbia. The former community no longer exists, but the Canyon Hot Springs Resort borders to its north, both immediately southwest of the Tangier River confluence with the Illecillewaet River.

Slocan Lake

Slocan Lake is a lake in the Slocan Valley of the West Kootenay region of the Southeastern Interior of British Columbia, Canada. it is drained by the Slocan River, which flows south from the lake's foot at Slocan City through the Slocan Valley to South Slocan, British Columbia, where that river meets the Kootenay River a few miles above its confluence with the Columbia. It is fed by Bonanza Creek, which comes down the pass from Summit Lake, beyond which is the town of Nakusp on Upper Arrow Lake.

Cody is at the confluence of Cody Creek into Carpenter Creek in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The ghost town, about one kilometre east of Sandon, lies off BC Highway 31A. By road, the former mining community is about 15 kilometres (9 mi) east of New Denver and 44 kilometres (27 mi) west of Kaslo.

Rosebery, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Rosebery is an unincorporated community about 6 kilometres (4 mi) north of New Denver in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The former steamboat landing and ferry terminal is at the mouth of Wilson Creek on the eastern shore of Slocan Lake. The locality, on BC Highway 6, is about 106 kilometres (66 mi) by road north of Castlegar and 144 kilometres (89 mi) by road and ferry south of Revelstoke.

Nashton, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Nashton is a ghost town in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The location is about 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of Kaslo on Highway 31A, at the confluence of Keen Creek and the Kaslo River. Prior names were Nashville, South Fork and Zwicky.

Poplar Creek, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Poplar Creek is a settlement in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The locality, on Highway 31, is about 37 kilometres (23 mi) northwest of Lardeau and 16 kilometres (10 mi) southeast of Gerrard.

Niagara, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Niagara is on the west side of the Granby River, near the junction with Fisherman Creek, in the Boundary Country region of south central British Columbia. The small community is about 12 kilometres (7 mi) north of Grand Forks on North Fork Rd.

Lemon Creek is an unincorporated community on the east side of the Slocan River in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The locality is on BC Highway 6 about 8 kilometres (5 mi) south of Slocan, and 62 kilometres (39 mi) north of Castlegar.

South Slocan is an unincorporated community on the northwest shore of the Kootenay River in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The village, which comprises 51 households, provides a very small tax base. Over the years the population has fluctuated between 50 and 175 people. A former railway junction on BC Highway 6, it is approximately 24 kilometres (15 mi) northeast of Castlegar, and 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of Nelson. Its postal category is Rural Route One.

Beavermouth (railway point), British Columbia Railway point in British Columbia, Canada

Beavermouth is about 43 kilometres (27 mi) west of Golden, and about 32 kilometres (20 mi) east of the mid-point of the Connaught Tunnel beneath Rogers Pass, in southeastern British Columbia. At the mouth of the Beaver River, the train station was called Beavermouth, but the adjacent community, which no longer exists, was known as Beaver or Beaver Mouth. Nowadays, the closest road access is to the nearby Kinbasket Lake Resort.

References