Three Forks, British Columbia

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Three Forks
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Three Forks
Location of Three Forks in British Columbia
Coordinates: 50°01′00″N117°17′00″W / 50.01667°N 117.28333°W / 50.01667; -117.28333 Coordinates: 50°01′00″N117°17′00″W / 50.01667°N 117.28333°W / 50.01667; -117.28333
CountryFlag of Canada.svg  Canada
Province Flag of British Columbia.svg  British Columbia

Three Forks is a ghost town located east of Slocan Lake, northeast of New Denver, in the Kootenays region of British Columbia. [1] The town was located at the forks of three creeks: Carpenter Creek, Seaton Creek, and Kane Creek. Three Forks was founded in 1892 with the discovery of silver in the area. The Nakusp and Slocan Railway passed through Three Forks. In the summer of 1894, Three Forks was destroyed by a forest fire. The town was rebuilt. In 1897 Henderson's Gazeteer listed 15 businesses in Three Forks. Three Forks contained six hotels: Brunswick, Black's, Richelieu, Wilmington, Slocan, and Miner's Exchange. Madigan stagecoaches passed through Three Forks on the way to Cody or Sandon. Pack trains of G.B. Matthews also passed through Three Forks. Three Forks's best years were between 1892 and 1902. By 1909 the town was in decline and nearby Sandon gained prominence. A few old ruins are all that remains of Three Forks. [2]

Ghost town city depopulated of inhabitants and that stays practically intact

A ghost town is an abandoned village, town, or city, usually one that contains substantial visible remains. A town often becomes a ghost town because the economic activity that supported it has failed, or due to natural or human-caused disasters such as floods, prolonged droughts, government actions, uncontrolled lawlessness, war, pollution, or nuclear disasters. The term can sometimes refer to cities, towns, and neighbourhoods that are still populated, but significantly less so than in past years; for example, those affected by high levels of unemployment and dereliction.

Slocan Lake lake in Canada

Slocan Lake is a lake in the Slocan Valley of the West Kootenay region of the Southeastern Interior of British Columbia, Canada. it is drained by the Slocan River, which flows south from the lake's foot at Slocan City through the Slocan Valley to South Slocan, British Columbia, where that river meets the Kootenay River a few miles above its confluence with the Columbia. It is fed by Bonanza Creek, which comes down the pass from Summit Lake, beyond which is the town of Nakusp on Upper Arrow Lake.

The Kootenays or Kootenay is a region of southeastern British Columbia. It takes its name from the Kootenay River, which in turn was named for the Kutenai First Nations people.

Television

Three Forks was featured on the historical television series Gold Trails and Ghost Towns, Season 3, Episode 5.

Gold Trails and Ghost Towns is a historical documentary show first produced for Canadian syndication, created and produced by Kelowna television station CHBC-TV and hosted by Mike Roberts with historian storyteller Bill Barlee. The show was filmed in a studio which resembled an old trapper's cabin. Mike and Bill discussed history of the old West by prospectors around 1900 in British Columbia.

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Erie, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

Erie is a ghost town located in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia. Erie is located eight miles west of Salmo, southwest of Nelson. The town of Erie was originally known as North Fork. Erie was founded in the 1860s when prospectors discovered gold in a canyon on a stream called North Fork Creek. North Fork Creek is now called Erie Creek. A mineshaft was bored up on the mountain at the Arlington claim and removed ore for several years. Cabins and bunkhouses were built about 1897 on the mountain. The Second Relief claim was formed later and worked too. One miner was named Gillam [who incidentally was the grandfather to singer Michelle Phillips.]

Nashton, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

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Pilot Bay, British Columbia Place in British Columbia, Canada

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Lemon Creek is an unincorporated community in the Slocan Valley region of southeastern British Columbia, Canada. Its name is derived from that of the creek of the same name, which was named for Robert Lemon, a prominent merchant in pre-Great War Nelson. It is a few miles south of Slocan City which is at the south end of Slocan Lake.

The Cripple Creek Gold Rush was a period of gold production in the Cripple Creek area from the late 1800s until the early 1900s. Mining exchanges were in Cripple Creek, Colorado Springs, Pueblo and Victor. Smelting was in Gillette, Florence, and (Old) Colorado City. Mining communities sprang up quickly, but most lasted only as long as gold continued to be produced. Settlements included:

References

  1. "Three Forks". BCGNIS. Retrieved 8 January 2012.
  2. N.L. Barlee (1973), Gold Creeks and Ghost Towns. Canada West Publications.