Three Lakes Valley (South Orkney Islands)

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Geography
Coordinates 60°42′S45°37′W / 60.700°S 45.617°W / -60.700; -45.617 Coordinates: 60°42′S45°37′W / 60.700°S 45.617°W / -60.700; -45.617

Three Lakes Valley ( 60°42′S45°37′W / 60.700°S 45.617°W / -60.700; -45.617 ) is a low valley containing three freshwater lakes, extending from the vicinity of Elephant Flats northward to Stygian Cove on Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The three lakes, from north to south, are Heywood Lake, Knob Lake, and Pumphouse Lake. The valley was surveyed and given this descriptive name by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1947. [1]

Heywood Lake is the northernmost lake in the valley. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Ronald B. Heywood, a limnologist with the British Antarctic Survey. [2]

Knob Lake is the central lake in the valley. It was named by UK-APC because there is a glacier-scoured rock knob forming a small island near the south end of the lake. [3]

Pumphouse Lake is the southernmost of the three lakes. It was named by UK-APC because of the abandoned pump house and pipeline, built by whalers, on the east side of the lake. [4]

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Signy Island is a small subantarctic island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was named by the Norwegian whaler Petter Sørlle (1884–1933) after his wife, Signy Therese.

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Tower Island island

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Willis Islands island group

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Andreaea Plateau is a small plateau with an average elevation of 180 metres (590 ft), located southwest of Robin Peak, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The feature is notable for the largest known stand in the Antarctic of the black-brown moss Andreaea.

The Batterbee Mountains are a group of prominent mountains rising to 2,200 metres (7,200 ft), which forms part of the dissected edge of Dyer Plateau overlooking George VI Sound, on the west coast of Palmer Land. First seen and photographed from the air by Lincoln Ellsworth on November 23, 1935, they were charted from the ground in October 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Rymill, and named after Sir Harry Batterbee (1880–1976), Assistant Under-Secretary of State, Dominions Office, 1930–38, and Chairman of the Polar Committee in 1934, who gave help to the expedition.

Borge Bay is a large, irregularly-shaped bay that dominates the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was charted in 1912 by Norwegian whaling captain Petter Sorlle, and named for Captain Hans Borge of the Polynesia, who undertook additional mapping of the bay during the following year. It was charted in more detail in 1927 and 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel, who named many of its features. It was surveyed further in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), which named several other features.

Usnea Ridge is a ridge at an elevation of 100–160 m, extending north-northwest from Jane Peak to Spindrift Col in central Signy Island, South Orkney Islands. This ridge was an ecological study site for British Antarctic Survey (BAS) biologists. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1991 after lichens of the genus Usnea, which form a main element of the plant life on the ridge.

Paternoster Valley is a valley extending southwestward from Stygian Cove in northern Signy Island. So named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) from the occurrence of three small paternoster lakes, at different levels in the valley.

Moe Island island

Moe Island is an island 1 nautical mile (2 km) long in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica, separated from the south-west end of Signy Island by Fyr Channel. It was charted by Captain Petter Sørlle in 1912–13, and named after M. Thoralf Moe of Sandefjord, Norway, a contemporary whaling captain who worked in this area. The northernmost point of the island is Spaull Point, named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after Vaughan W. Spaull, British Antarctic Survey (BAS) biologist on Signy Island, 1969.

The Gneiss Hills are two prominent hills, 270 and 260 metres high, at the west side of McLeod Glacier in the south part of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. They were so named by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, following their survey of 1947, because of a band of pink gneiss outcrops near the summits.

Moraine Valley is a valley filled with morainic debris, 0.75 nautical miles (1.4 km) long, which drains north into Elephant Flats on the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. In summer a stream, fed by the ice slopes at its south end, runs in this valley. It was named by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey following their survey of 1947.

Sandefjord Peaks is a set of three conical peaks, the highest 635 m, marking the southwest end of Pomona Plateau at the west end of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The southernmost of these peaks was named Sandefjord Peak after nearby Sandefjord Bay by DI personnel in 1933. The collective name, Sandefjord Peaks, was recommended by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) following a survey of the peaks by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1950.

Robin Peak is a sharply defined rocky summit which is the northernmost peak on Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1954 for Gordon de Quetteville Robin of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), the leader at Signy Island base in 1947, who made the first detailed survey of the island.

Limestone Valley is a valley extending northwest from Cemetery Bay, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The valley leads directly to Jane Col and serves as a route to the west coast of the island. It was so named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee because of an exposure of limestone in the cliff above the valley.

Tioga Lake is a small lake in the South Orkney Islands. It lies north-northeast of Port Jebsen and northwest of Tioga Hill, from which it takes its name, on Signy Island. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1981.

References

  1. "Three Lakes Valley". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  2. "Heywood Lake". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  3. "Knob Lake". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2020-05-05.
  4. "Pumphouse Lake". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2020-05-05.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from websites or documents ofthe United States Geological Survey .