Three Lives

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Three Lives may refer to:

<i>Three Lives</i> (book) novel by Gertrude Stein

Three Lives (1909) was American writer Gertrude Stein's first published book. The book is separated into three stories, "The Good Anna", "Melanctha", and "The Gentle Lena".

Three Lives (short story)

"Three Lives" is a short story by Pu Songling first published in Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio which follows the past lives of a scholar. It has been adapted into a play and translated into English.

<i>Three Lives</i> (film) 1924 film by Ivan Perestiani

Three Lives is a 1924 Georgian silent film directed by Ivan Perestiani.

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