Three Palace Sanctuaries

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Three Palace Sanctuaries in the Taisho Era in the 1920s Three Palace Sanctuaries in the Taisho era.JPG
Three Palace Sanctuaries in the Taishō Era in the 1920s

The Three Palace Sanctuaries (宮中三殿, Kyūchū sanden) are a group of structures in the precincts of the Tokyo Imperial Palace in Japan. They are used in imperial religious ceremonies, including weddings and enthronements.

The three sanctuaries are:

See also

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References

Coordinates: 35°40′54″N139°44′59″E / 35.68167°N 139.74972°E / 35.68167; 139.74972