Three Rivers College

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Three Rivers College may refer to:

Three Rivers Community College is a community college in Norwich, Connecticut, USA, formed in 1992 by the merger of Mohegan Community College and Thames Valley State Technical College. It is named after the three major rivers in the region: the Shetucket, the Yantic and the Thames. It is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Three Rivers College is a community college in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, USA.

Three Rivers Academy Sixth Form College is a Sixth Form College located in Walton-on-Thames, in the Elmbridge district of Surrey. Three Rivers Academy Sixth Form college is part of Three Rivers Academy.

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