Three Rivers Peak

Last updated
Three Rivers Peak
Highest point
Elevation 9,764 ft (2,976 m)
Coordinates 44°51′01″N110°53′00″W / 44.85028°N 110.88333°W / 44.85028; -110.88333 (Three Rivers Peak) [1]
Geography
Location Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Montana
Parent range Gallatin Range

Three Rivers Peak el. 9,764 feet (2,976 m)[ citation needed ] is a mountain peak in the southern section of the Gallatin Range in Yellowstone National Park.

Gallatin Range mountain range

The Gallatin Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains, located in the U.S. states of Montana and Wyoming. It includes more than 10 mountains over 10,000 feet (3,000 m). The highest peak in the range is Electric Peak at 10,969 feet (3,343 m).

Yellowstone National Park first national park in the world, located in the US states Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

Yellowstone National Park is an American national park located in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. It was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872. Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world. The park is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features, especially Old Faithful geyser, one of its most popular features. It has many types of ecosystems, but the subalpine forest is the most abundant. It is part of the South Central Rockies forests ecoregion.

See also

Notes

Related Research Articles

Absaroka Range mountain range

The Absaroka Range is a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. The range stretches about 150 mi (240 km) across the Montana-Wyoming border, and 75 miles at its widest, forming the eastern boundary of Yellowstone National Park along Paradise Valley (Montana), and the western side of the Bighorn Basin. The range borders the Beartooth Mountains to the north and the Wind River Range to the south. The northern edge of the range rests along I-90 and Livingston, Montana. The highest peak in the range is Francs Peak, located in Wyoming at 13,153 ft (4,009 m). There are 46 other peaks over 12,000 ft (3,700 m).

Eagle Peak (Wyoming) mountain

Eagle Peak is a mountain in the Absaroka Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming and at 11,372 feet (3,466 m) is the highest point in Yellowstone National Park. It is located about 6 miles (9.7 km) east of the southeast arm of Yellowstone Lake.

Mount Holmes mountain in United States of America

Mount Holmes is a prominent mountain peak in Yellowstone National Park. It is the tallest mountain in the Wyoming portion of the Gallatin Range. Mount Holmes is located in the northwestern part of the park and marks the southern terminus of the Gallatin Range. It is the source of Indian Creek, a tributary of the Gardner River.

Outline of Yellowstone National Park Wikimedia list article

The following articles relate to the history, geography, geology, flora, fauna, structures and recreation in Yellowstone National Park.

Mount Haynes mountain in United States of America

Mount Haynes el. 8,218 feet (2,505 m) is a prominent peak adjacent to the Madison River in Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named by then Yellowstone superintendent Horace Albright to honor Frank Jay Haynes (1853–1921), the first official photographer of the park. Prior to being named Mount Haynes, the peak was unofficially called Mount Burley for D. E. Burley of the Union Pacific Railroad. Today there is an interpretive overlook along the Madison River just opposite the peak.

Mount Sheridan mountain

Mount Sheridan el. 10,313 feet (3,143 m) is a prominent mountain peak overlooking Heart Lake in the Red Mountains of Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named in honor of General Philip H. Sheridan, U.S. Army, one of the early protectors of the park.

Mount Schurz mountain in United States of America

Mount Schurz el. 11,007 feet (3,355 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. Mount Schurz is the second highest peak in Yellowstone. The mountain was originally named Mount Doane by Henry D. Washburn during the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition in 1871. Later the name Mount Doane was given to another peak in the Absaroka Range by geologist Arnold Hague. In 1885, Hague named the mountain for the 13th U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Carl Schurz (1877–1881). Schurz was the first Secretary of the Interior to visit Yellowstone and a strong supporter of the national park movement.

Mount Doane mountain in United States of America

Mount Doane el. 10,551 feet (3,216 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named for Lieutenant Gustavus Cheyney Doane, a U.S. Army cavalry officer who escorted the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition into Yellowstone in 1870. During that expedition, Doane and Nathaniel P. Langford ascended several peaks east of Yellowstone Lake.

Colter Peak mountain in United States of America

Colter Peak el. 10,640 feet (3,240 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in the southeastern section of Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named for mountain man John Colter, reputedly the first white man to visit the Yellowstone region. Colter Peak was first ascended in 1870 by Lt. Gustavus Cheyney Doane and Nathaniel P. Langford during the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition. Henry D. Washburn, the expedition leader named the peak for Langford and Doane. For unknown reasons, geologist Ferdinand V. Hayden moved those names to peaks farther north in 1871 during the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871. In 1888, Philetus Norris the second park superintendent, named the peak Mount Forum for unknown reasons. In 1885, geologist Arnold Hague gave the peak its official name: Colter Peak.

Abiathar Peak mountain in United States of America

Abiathar Peak el. 10,928 feet (3,331 m) is a mountain peak in the northeastern section of Yellowstone National Park of Absaroka Range. The peak was named by members of the 1885 Hague Geological Survey to honor Charles Abiathar White, a geologist and paleontologist who had participated in early western geological surveys. White never visited Yellowstone.

Mount Jackson (Wyoming)

Mount Jackson el. 8,231 feet (2,509 m) is a mountain peak just north of the Madison River, in the Gallatin Range of Yellowstone National Park. Mount Jackson is named in honor of William Henry Jackson, chief photographer of the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871 and a member of several subsequent geological surveys in the park. Jackson's photographs are some of the earliest ever taken in Yellowstone. The name was suggested by a park naturalist in 1935 but not awarded until 1937 when Jackson, who was still living gave his approval. Jackson visited the park regularly until his death in 1942.

Mount Langford mountain in United States of America

Mount Langford el. 10,623 feet (3,238 m) is a mountain peak in the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak is named for Nathaniel P. Langford, the first superintendent of Yellowstone and a leader of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition to Yellowstone in 1870. The expedition and Langford's subsequent promotion in Scribner's helped in the creation of the park in 1872.

Barronette Peak mountain in United States of America

Barronette Peak el. 10,354 feet (3,156 m) is a mountain peak in the northeast section of Yellowstone National Park in the Absaroka Range. The peak is named for Collins Jack Baronette (1829–1901). It was named by the Hayden Geological Survey of 1878. When named, the name was misspelled Barronette and it retains the official misspelled name today.

Cook Peak mountain in Wyoming, USA

Cook Peak el. 9,754 feet (2,973 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1922 by then superintendent Horace Albright to honor of Charles W. Cook, a member of the 1869 Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition which explored the Yellowstone park region. 1922 was the 50th anniversary of the park's creation, and Charles Cook, still living in Montana, attended ceremonies in the park. Prior to 1922, the peak had been named Thompson Peak by Philetus Norris in 1880 and Storm Peak by members of the Arnold Hague Geological Surveys in 1885.

Dunraven Peak mountain in United States of America

Dunraven Peak el. 9,869 feet (3,008 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. In 1874, just two years after the park's creation, the Earl of Dunraven, a titled Englishman made a visit to Yellowstone in conjunction with a hunting expedition led by Texas Jack Omohundro to the Northern Rockies. He was so impressed with the park, that he devoted well over 150 pages to Yellowstone in his The Great Divide, published in London in 1874. The Great Divide was one of the earliest works to praise and publicize the park.

Hedges Peak mountain in United States of America

Hedges Peak el. 9,669 feet (2,947 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1895 by geologist Arnold Hague to honor Cornelius Hedges (1837–1907), a member of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition of 1871 and prominent Montana lawyer. Hedges accounts of the expedition in Helena Daily Herald newspaper contributed to the campaign to create Yellowstone National Park. Prior to 1895 the peak had been named Surprise Peak by geologist J.P. Iddings in 1883.

Druid Peak mountain in United States of America

Druid Peak is a moderate domed peak on the southern flank of the Absaroka Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak lies just north of the Lamar River and Soda Butte Creek confluence at the head of the Lamar Valley. Prior to 1885, this summit was named Soda Hill by members of the Hayden Geological Survey of 1878 and Mount Longfellow or Longfellows' Peak by then park superintendent Philetus Norris in 1880. In 1885, members of the Arnold Hague Geological Survey changed the name to Druid Peak for unknown reasons, but some historians believe it may have been the presence of Stonehenge like rock formations on its eastern face that prompted the name.

Douglas Knob mountain in United States of America

Douglas Knob el. 8,507 feet (2,593 m) is an isolated mountain peak in the southwest section of Yellowstone National Park. Located just east of the Littler Fork of the Bechler River at the southern extent of the Madison Plateau, Douglas Knob is named for Joseph O. Douglas. In 1962, then Assistant Chief Ranger, William S. Chapman named the summit for Douglas who was an early Park Ranger. In 1921, Douglas was the Assistant Chief Ranger as well as the park's chief Buffalo Keeper. The summit is less than .25 miles (0.40 km) east of the Bechler River trail.

Mount Hancock (Wyoming) mountain in United States of America

Mount Hancock el. 10,223 feet (3,116 m) is an isolated mountain peak on Big Game Ridge in Yellowstone National Park. Captain John W. Barlow named the peak in honor of General Winfield Scott Hancock during the Barlow-Heap Exploration of Yellowstone in 1871. General Hancock is noted for issuing the orders that established the military escort led by Lt. Gustavus Cheyney Doane for the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition of 1870.