Three Songs About Lenin

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Three Songs About Lenin
Directed by Dziga Vertov
Written byDziga Vertov
CinematographyMark Magidson
Bentsion Monastyrsky
Dmitri Surensky
Distributed byAmkino Corporation (USA) (1934)
Release date
  • 1934 (1934)
Running time
57 minutes
CountrySoviet Union
Language Silent film
Three Songs about Lenin

Three Songs About Lenin (Russian : Три песни о Ленине, 1934) is a documentary silent film by Ukrainian-Russian filmmaker Dziga Vertov. It is based on three admiring songs sung by anonymous people in Soviet Russia about Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. It is made up of 3 episodes and is 57 minutes long.

In 1969 it was re-edited by Elizaveta Svilova, Ilya Kopalin and Serafima Pumpyanskaya as part of the 1970 Lenin centenary. [1]

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References

  1. "Allegory and Accommodation: Vertov's Three Songs of Lenin (1934) as a Stalinist film" (PDF). Film History. 2006. Retrieved 2009-09-06.