Threekingham

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Threekingham
St.Peter's church, Threekingham - geograph.org.uk - 147411.jpg
St Peter's Church, Threekingham
Lincolnshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Threekingham
Location within Lincolnshire
Population233 (2011)
OS grid reference TF091364
  London 100 mi (160 km)  S
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town SLEAFORD
Postcode district NG34
Police Lincolnshire
Fire Lincolnshire
Ambulance East Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
52°54′51″N0°22′42″W / 52.914035°N 0.378225°W / 52.914035; -0.378225 Coordinates: 52°54′51″N0°22′42″W / 52.914035°N 0.378225°W / 52.914035; -0.378225

Threekingham (sometimes Threckingham or Tricengham) is a village in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 233. [1] It is situated on the A52 Grantham to Boston road, 6 miles (10 km) south from Sleaford, and close to the A15 Threekingham Bar roundabout. Mareham Lane, the Roman Road aligned with King Street, crosses the A15 at Threekingham.

Contents

History

The name of the town means "home of Tric's people." Tric is a Brittonic personal name, though it is unclear whether Tric himself was a Briton or whether he was descended from Anglo-Saxon migrants but given a name borrowed from Celtic speakers who possibly lived nearby. Either way, Threekingham itself is a Germanic name, given by speakers of Old English. [2]

A folk etymology that developed in the later Anglo-Saxon period derives the name from "home of the three kings," supposedly because three Danish kings were buried there; however, this is incorrect. [3]

Threekingham parish church is dedicated to St. Peter ad Vincula [4] (St Peter in chains). [5] The village public house is the Three Kings Inn. [6]

The Medieval Stow Fair was held nearby, less than 1 mile (1.6 km) to the south. It is possible that it was the site of the early medieval nunnery founded in the late 7th century by Saint Werburh, dedicated to Saint Æthelthryth, and probably destroyed by the Danes c. 870. [7]

There are ancient earthworks and a mound called Threekingham Beacon to the west of the village. [8] The post-medieval garden features overlie much older earthworks and tumuli. The remains of a moated manor house are in Hall Lane. [9]

There is a Whalebone Arch marking the entrance to Laundon Hall.

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References

  1. "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 1 June 2016.
  2. John Insley, "Britons and Anglo-Saxons," in Kulturelle Integration und Personennamen im Mittelalter (ed. Wolfgang Haubrichs and Christa Jochum-Godglück), 2018, p. 268
  3. Eleanor Parker, Dragon Lords: The History and Legends of Viking England, 2018, p. 190
  4. Geograph
  5. Historic England. "St Peters Church (348571)". PastScape. Retrieved 21 October 2013.
  6. "Three Kings Inn, Threekingham", Geograph
  7. Historic England. "National Monument Record for St Æthelreda's nunnery (348635)". PastScape. Retrieved 21 October 2013.
  8. Historic England. "National Monument Record for gardens of West Hall (348561)". PastScape. Retrieved 21 October 2013.
  9. Historic England. "National Monument Record for moated manor (348580)". PastScape. Retrieved 21 October 2013.