Threepence (Australian)

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Reverse and obverse of threepence coin of 1958 (approximately actual size) Australian 1958 threepence.jpg
Reverse and obverse of threepence coin of 1958 (approximately actual size)
A 1942 Australian threepence (reverse) minted in San Francisco Threepence.jpg
A 1942 Australian threepence (reverse) minted in San Francisco

The Australian Threepence is a small silver coin used in the Commonwealth of Australia prior to decimalisation. It was minted from 1910 until 1964, excluding 1913, 1929–1933 inclusive, 1937, 1945 and 1946. After decimalisation on 14 February 1966, the coin was equivalent to 2½¢, but was rapidly withdrawn from circulation.

Decimalisation is the conversion of a system of currency or of weights and measures to units related by powers of 10.

Contents

During World War II, threepence production was supplemented by coinage produced by the United States Mint at the San Francisco and Denver mints. Coins minted at the San Francisco mint from 1942–1944 contain a small capital S on the reverse, while coins produced at the Denver mint from 1942–1943 have a small capital D on the reverse.

World War II 1939–1945, between Axis and Allies

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from more than 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 70 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

United States Mint Produces circulating coinage for the United States

The United States Mint is a unit of the Department of Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The Mint was created in Philadelphia in 1792, and soon joined by other centers, whose coins were identified by their own mint marks. There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.

Types

ImageYearsTechnical parametersDescription / Legend / Designer
ObverseReverseFromToDiameterThicknessMassCompositionEdgeObverseReverse
1910191016 mm1.41 g92.5% silver, 7.5% copperPlain Edward VII
EDWARDVS VII D:G: BRITT. OMN: REX F: D: IND: IMP:
by George William de Saulles
Coat of arms of Australia
THREEPENCE
by W.H.J. Blakemore
19111936 George V
GEORGIVS V D.G.BRITT: OMN: REX F.D.IND:IMP:
by Bertram Mackennal
19381944 George VI
GEORGIVS VI D:G:BR:OMN:REX: F:D:IND:IMP.
by Thomas Hugh Paget
3 stalks of grain
AUSTRALIA THREE PENCE
by George Kruger Gray (K G under ribbon)
1947194850% silver, 40% copper, 5% nickel, 5% zinc
19491952 George VI
GEORGIVS VI D:G:BR:OMN:REX FIDEI DEF.
by Thomas Hugh Paget
19531954 Elizabeth II
+ ELIZABETH.II.DEI.GRATIA.REGINA
by Mary Gillick
19551964 Elizabeth II
+ ELIZABETH.II.DEI.GRATIA.REGINA.F:D:
by Mary Gillick
These images are to scale at 2.5 pixels per millimetre. For table standards, see the coin specification table.

Mintmarks

See also

The Australian Halfpenny was a coin used in the Commonwealth of Australia prior to decimalisation. The coin was first minted in 1911 and minting ceased in 1964, excluding 1937, 1956–1958 inclusive. When the Australian currency was decimalised on 14 February 1966 the coin was equal to ​512c.

Sixpence (Australian) coin minted in Australia until 1963

The Australian sixpence was a coin used in the Commonwealth of Australia prior to the decimalisation of the Australian currency in 1966. The pre-decimal sixpence was minted from 1910 until 1963, excluding the years 1913, 1915, 1929–33 inclusive, 1937, 1947 and 1949.

The Australian Shilling was a coin of the Commonwealth of Australia prior to decimalisation. The coin was minted from 1910 until 1963, excluding 1923, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1938, 1947, 1949 and 1951. After decimalisation on 14 February 1966, it was equal to 10c.

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Threepence (British coin)

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Threepence (Irish coin)

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Shilling (British coin) British pre-decimalisation coin

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References

The Standard Catalog of World Coins is a series of numismatic catalogs, commonly known as the Krause catalogs. They are published by Krause Publications, a division of F+W Media.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Preceded by
Threepence (British)
Threepence
1910–1966
Succeeded by
Denomination Abolished