Threnody

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Jan Kochanowski with his dead daughter in a painting by Jan Matejko inspired by the poet's Threnodies Treny normal.jpg
Jan Kochanowski with his dead daughter in a painting by Jan Matejko inspired by the poet's Threnodies

A threnody is a wailing ode, song, hymn or poem of mourning composed or performed as a memorial to a dead person. The term originates from the Greek word θρηνῳδία (threnoidia), from θρῆνος (threnos, "wailing") and ᾠδή (oide, "ode"), [1] [2] the latter ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *h₂weyd- ("to sing") that is also the precursor of such words as "ode", "tragedy", "comedy", "parody", "melody" and "rhapsody".

Contents

Synonyms include "dirge", "coronach", "lament" and "elegy". The Epitaphios Threnos is the lamentation chanted in the Eastern Orthodox Church on Holy Saturday. John Dryden commemorated the death of Charles II of England in the long poem Threnodia Augustalis , and Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote a "Threnody" in memory of his son. [3]

Examples

In jazz:

See also

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References

  1. The Oxford Companion to Music (2010)
  2. "Threnody". Online Etymology Dictionary . Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  3. Grove Music Online (2010)
  4. Peretz, Maya (1993). "In Search of the First Polish Woman Author". The Polish Review. 38 (4): 470.
  5. Bright Sheng: Orchestral Works. Naxos (2002).
  6. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-06-30. Retrieved 2015-06-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. Pierce, Peter (2002). "Australian and American literature of the Vietnam War" in Australia's Vietnam War, p. 132. Texas A&M University Press. ISBN   1585441376
  8. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-10-14. Retrieved 2013-09-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

Bibliography