Thrilling Publications

Last updated
Thrilling Publications
IndustryMagazine publication
Founded1928
Founder Ned Pines
Defunct1961
Headquarters
Products Magazines, pulp magazines
Services Publishing
Parent Standard Comics

Thrilling Publications, also known as Beacon Magazines[ citation needed ] (193637), Better Publications (193743) and Standard Magazines (194355), was a pulp magazine publisher run by Ned Pines, publishing such titles as Startling Stories and Thrilling Wonder Stories .

Contents

Pines became the president of Pines Publications in 1928. Pines folded most of his magazines in 1955 but continued to lead the company until 1961.

Cover artists

Pines' cover artists included Earle K. Bergey, John Parker, George Rozen, and Rudolph Belarski.

Paperbacks

In 1942 Pines started Popular Library, a paperback publishing house, and devoted himself to that company after closing his other ventures. Popular reprinted materials from the pulps.[ citation needed ]

Characters

Titles

See also

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References