Thrinaxodon Col

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Thrinaxodon Col ( 85°12′S174°19′W / 85.200°S 174.317°W / -85.200; -174.317 Coordinates: 85°12′S174°19′W / 85.200°S 174.317°W / -85.200; -174.317 ) is a rock col 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southeast of Rougier Hill. The col is along the ridge that trends southward from Rougier Hill in the Cumulus Hills, Queen Maud Mountains. The name was proposed to Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in 1971 by geologist David H. Elliot of the Ohio State University Institute of Polar Studies. The col is a very important fossil (vertebrate) locality at which several specimens of the mammal-like reptile Thrinaxodon were found.

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Rougier Hill is an ice-free hill just east of LaPrade Valley in the north part of the Cumulus Hills, overlooking the south side of McGregor Glacier. Named by the Texas Tech Shackleton Glacier Expedition (1964–65) for Michael Rougier, staff photographer with Life Magazine who was seriously injured while climbing this hill with the expedition.

The Cumulus Hills are several groups of largely barren hills in Antarctica. Divided by the Logie Glacier, they are bounded by Shackleton Glacier on the west, McGregor Glacier on the north and Zaneveld Glacier on the south. The exposed rock in this area was observed on a number of occasions to give rise to the formation of cumulus clouds, considered to be very rare at this elevation. The hills were named by the Southern Party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1961–62) because of these clouds.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thrinaxodon Col" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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