Thrinay

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Thrinay is a word from sanskrit language. It has multiple meanings. Trina means throne in Sanskrit. The word Thrinay means one who is seated on throne. It is mainly used to describe Gods and Goddesses in Hindu religion. It is used more in Devi Mahatmya to address Saraswati, one of the three supreme goddesses of Hindu religion. In some Puranas (like Skanda Purana) Saraswati is considered the daughter of Shiva (Shivaanujaa) and in some Tantras she is associated with Ganesha as his sister.

Sanskrit ancient Indian language

Sanskrit is a language of ancient India with a history going back about 3,500 years. It is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism and the predominant language of most works of Hindu philosophy as well as some of the principal texts of Buddhism and Jainism. Sanskrit, in its variants and numerous dialects, was the lingua franca of ancient and medieval India. In the early 1st millennium CE, along with Buddhism and Hinduism, Sanskrit migrated to Southeast Asia, parts of East Asia and Central Asia, emerging as a language of high culture and of local ruling elites in these regions.

Throne seat of state of a potentate or dignitary

A throne is the seat of state of a potentate or dignitary, especially the seat occupied by a sovereign on state occasions; or the seat occupied by a pope or bishop on ceremonial occasions. "Throne" in an abstract sense can also refer to the monarchy or the Crown itself, an instance of metonymy, and is also used in many expressions such as "the power behind the throne". The expression "ascend (mount) the throne" takes its meaning from the steps leading up to the dais or platform, on which the throne is placed, being formerly comprised in the word's significance.

<i>Devi Mahatmya</i> Hindu religious text

The Devi Mahatmya or Devi Mahatmyam, or "Glory of the Goddess") is a Hindu religious text describing the Goddess as the supreme power and creator of the universe. It is part of the Markandeya Purana, and estimated to have been composed in Sanskrit between 400-600 CE.

Some also consider Thrinay as one of the names of Lord Shiva.

Shiva Hindu god, supreme being of the universe

Shiva also known as Mahadeva is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is the supreme being within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.

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Vibhuti

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<i>Matsya Purana</i> medieval era Sanskrit text, one of eighteen major Puranas

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Adi Parashakti Hindu goddess

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