Throat-clear

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A throat-clear is a sound made at the back of the throat. [1]

Contents

The throat-clear is articulated as a single-syllable exclamation, written onomatopoeiacally as "hem"; [2] or it may be articulated as a double-syllable sound, written as "ahem", which is expressed by inhaling slightly and then exhaling more forcibly.

Paralanguage

The deliberately executed throat-clear is a nonverbal, paralingual form of metacommunication. [3] A loud, exaggerated throat-clearing noise may sometimes be used to get attention.

Upper respiratory

The throat-clear may be articulated consciously or unconsciously as a symptom of a number of laryngopharyngeal (upper respiratory tract) ailments. [4]

Voice

Continual throat-clearing is a symptom of chronically dry vocal cords, caused by insufficiently produced amounts of mucus due to inadequate amounts of water and by excessive amounts of caffeine and alcohol.

Related Research Articles

In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract. Examples are and [b], pronounced with the lips; and [d], pronounced with the front of the tongue; and [g], pronounced with the back of the tongue;, pronounced in the throat;, [v], and, pronounced by forcing air through a narrow channel (fricatives); and and, which have air flowing through the nose (nasals). Contrasting with consonants are vowels.

International Phonetic Alphabet Alphabetic system of phonetic notation

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin script. It was devised by the International Phonetic Association in the late 19th century as a standardized representation of speech sounds in written form. The IPA is used by lexicographers, foreign language students and teachers, linguists, speech–language pathologists, singers, actors, constructed language creators and translators.

Schwa Vowel sound

In linguistics, specifically phonetics and phonology, schwa is the mid central vowel sound, placed in the central position of the vowel chart, denoted by the IPA symbol ⟨ə⟩, or another vowel sound close to that position. It is the vowel sound produced when the lips, tongue, and jaw are completely relaxed. An example in English is the vowel sound of the ⟨a⟩ in the word about. Schwa in English is found in unstressed positions, but in some other languages it occurs more frequently as a stressed vowel.

Palatine uvula Fleshy appendage that hangs from the back of the palate

The palatine uvula, usually referred to as simply the uvula, is a conic projection from the back edge of the middle of the soft palate, composed of connective tissue containing a number of racemose glands, and some muscular fibers. It also contains many serous glands, which produce thin saliva.

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A mora is a basic timing unit in the phonology of some spoken languages, equal to or shorter than a syllable. For example, a short syllable such as ba consists of one mora (monomoraic), while a long syllable such as baa consists of two (bimoraic); extra-long syllables with three moras (trimoraic) are relatively rare. Such metrics is also referred to as syllable weight.

Cough Sudden expulsion of air from the lungs as a reflex to clear irritants

A cough is a sudden expulsion of air through the large breathing passages that can help clear them of fluids, irritants, foreign particles and microbes. As a protective reflex, coughing can be repetitive with the cough reflex following three phases: an inhalation, a forced exhalation against a closed glottis, and a violent release of air from the lungs following opening of the glottis, usually accompanied by a distinctive sound.

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Laryngitis Medical condition

Laryngitis is inflammation of the larynx. Symptoms often include a hoarse voice and may include fever, cough, pain in the front of the neck, and trouble swallowing. Typically, these last under two weeks.

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References

  1. "CLEAR YOUR THROAT | definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary". dictionary.cambridge.org.
  2. Nänny, Max; Fischer, Olga (1999). Form Miming Meaning: Iconicity in Language and Literature. John Benjamins Publishing. ISBN   9789027221797 . Retrieved 25 July 2019.
  3. "ahem". Onomatopoeia List. August 10, 2013.
  4. "Throat Clearing - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments". www.healthgrades.com. June 26, 2014.