Thrond Sjursen Haukenæs

Last updated

Thrond Sjursen Haukenæs (March 4, 1840 – November 14, 1922) [1] was a Norwegian folklore collector and an author, publisher, and distributor of his own works. [2] [3]

Contents

Haukenæs was born at the Haukanes farm on the Granvin Fjord between Granvin and Folkedal in Hordaland county. Haukenæs initially worked as a shepherd, and then spent several years fishing for herring and also traveling around as a book seller. He married Kristi Gjerdsdotter Aalvik (1849–1914) from Indre Ålvik in 1871 [2] and then settled down as a trader in Granvin. He went into business with his friend Rikoll Eide. Haukenæs then became the manager of the Graven Consumer Association (Gravens Forbrugsforening), which developed to operate mail services, a coaching inn, and a hotel. The association experienced economic difficulties, and so Haukenæs took it over at book value and then continued it as a private operation.

Folklore collector

After meeting Peter Christen Asbjørnsen during a collection expedition in Hardanger in the summer of 1870, Haukenæs also started gathering folk material in the district. In 1882 he published a request in several newspapers in Western Norway for people in Hardanger, Voss, and neighboring villages to send him manuscript collections with oral traditions.

In 1883, Haukenæs's business went bankrupt, and at the same time he lost his entire private library. This combination of material distress and poor prospects led Haukenæs to embark on a new endeavor that attracted him; namely to cultivate his new hobby of collecting and publishing folk material. Haukenæs was extremely productive, but did not trust his own writing skills, and so he sought help from the more experienced writer Jon Nilsson Skaar from Botnen at the head of Fykse Sound. He paid Skaar to help him write out and arrange the available material.

In 1890, Haukenæs visited the well-known folklore collector Peder Fylling at his home in Skodje. A travelogue from his trip was published in the newspaper Sunnmørsposten . [4]

Author and publisher

In a series of books, Haukenæs presented information about nature, folk life, and folk belief in Hardanger, Sunnhordland, and Voss. He also wrote an autobiography. The print runs were quite small; this, combined with some mishaps—such as some boxes of books that burned during a fire in Granvin in 1885 and a large shipment of books that went down with the steamer Ole Bull when the ship was wrecked outside Volda in 1888—has resulted in many of Haukenæs's titles being very rare and hard to obtain.

Haukenæs was successful as an author, and on May 17, 1899 he and his family were able to move into his attractive new home at the Solbakken farm at Eide in Granvin, named after Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson's 1857 peasant novel Synnøve Solbakken . By the time he turned 60 the next year, Haukenæs had been able to write no fewer than 30 books in 16 years.

Bibliography

Related Research Articles

Hordaland Former county (fylke) of Norway

Hordaland was a county in Norway, bordering Sogn og Fjordane, Buskerud, Telemark, and Rogaland counties. Hordaland was the third largest county after Akershus and Oslo by population. The county government was the Hordaland County Municipality which is located in Bergen. Before 1972, the city of Bergen was its own separate county apart from Hordaland. On 1 January 2020, the county was merged with neighbouring Sogn og Fjordane county to form the new Vestland county.

Jondal Former municipality in Hordaland, Norway

Jondal is a former municipality in the old Hordaland county, Norway. The 247-square-kilometre (95 sq mi) municipality existed from 1863 until its dissolution in 2020 when it became part of Ullensvang Municipality. It was located on the Folgefonna peninsula in the Hardanger district, on the eastern shore of the Hardangerfjorden. The administrative centre of the municipality was the village of Jondal. Other villages in Jondal include Herand, Kysnesstranda, and Torsnes.

Ullensvang Municipality in Vestland, Norway

Ullensvang is a municipality in Vestland county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Hardanger. The administrative centre is the town of Odda. Some of the notable villages in the municipality include Lofthus, Utne, Vikebygd, Alsåker, Botnen, Eitrheim, Håra, Røldal, Seljestad, Skare, Tyssedal, Jondal, Herand, Kysnesstranda, and Torsnes.

Eidfjord Municipality in Vestland, Norway

Eidfjord is a municipality in Vestland county, Norway. The municipality is located in the traditional district of Hardanger. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Eidfjord, where the majority of the municipal population lives. The other major population centre in the municipality is the village of Øvre Eidfjord.

Ulvik Municipality in Vestland, Norway

Ulvik is a municipality in Vestland county, Norway. The municipality stretches from the Hardangerfjord to the mountains that reach 1,800 metres (5,900 ft) above sea level. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Ulvik. The villages of Osa and Finse are also located in Ulvik municipality.

Granvin Former municipality in Hordaland, Norway

Granvin is a former municipality in the old Hordaland county, Norway. The municipality existed from 1838 until its dissolution in 2020 when it merged with Voss Municipality. The municipality was located in the traditional district of Hardanger. The administrative centre of Granvin was the village of Eide, which is also called "Granvin". About half of the residents of the municipality lived in the municipal centre. The rest lived in the rural valley areas surrounding the Granvin Fjord or the lake Granvinsvatnet in the central part of the municipality.

Voss Municipality in Vestland, Norway

Voss  is a municipality and a traditional district in Vestland county, Norway. The administrative center of the municipality is the village of Vossevangen. Other villages include Bolstadøyri, Borstrondi, Evanger, Kvitheim, Mjølfjell, Oppheim, Stalheim, and Vinje.

Hardanger District in Vestland, Norway

Hardanger is a traditional district in the western part of Norway, dominated by the Hardangerfjord and its inner branches of the Sørfjorden and the Eid Fjord. It consists of the municipalities of Ullensvang, Eidfjord, Ulvik, Voss, and Kvam, and is located inside the county of Vestland.

Røldal Stave Church Church in Vestland, Norway

Røldal Stave Church is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Ullensvang Municipality in Vestland county, Norway. It is located in the village of Røldal. It is the church for the Røldal parish which is part of the Hardanger og Voss prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Bjørgvin. The brown, wooden stave church was built in around the year 1250 using designs by an unknown architect. The church seats about 130 people and is built in a long church style. The church is a preserved historic museum, but it is still a regularly-used parish church that holds regularly scheduled worship services twice a month.

Hans Larsen Saakvitne was a Norwegian farmer, bailiff and politician for the Liberal Party. He was mayor for several years, and served four terms as a regular representative in the Norwegian Parliament.

Arnoldus von Westen Sylow Koren Norwegian politician

Arnoldus von Westen Sylow Koren was a civil servant and district judge. He served as a representative at the Norwegian Constitutional Assembly.

Niels Hertzberg Norwegian politician

Niels Hertzberg was a Norwegian priest and politician.

Granvin (village) Village in Western Norway, Norway

Granvin, also known as Eide, is a village in Voss Municipality in Vestland county, Norway. The village is located at the head of the Granvin Fjord in the southeastern part of the municipality. The large village of Vossevangen lies about 25 kilometres (16 mi) to the northwest and the village of Ulvik lies about 20 kilometres (12 mi) to the northeast.

Røldal (municipality) Former municipality in Hordaland, Norway

Røldal is a former municipality in the southeastern corner of the old Hordaland county, Norway. The 719-square-kilometre (278 sq mi) municipality existed from 1838 until 1964 and it was located in the southeastern part of the present-day Ullensvang Municipality. The administrative centre was the village of Røldal, where the Røldal Stave Church is located. The municipality encompassed the Røldalen valley and some small side valleys, as well as a large area up on the vast Hardangervidda plateau. Historically, Røldal was an important trade and transportation route between Eastern and Western Norway.

Hardanger Folkeblad is a Norwegian newspaper, published in Odda in Hordaland, and covering Odda, Ullensvang and Eidfjord. The newspaper was founded in 1940, and its first editor was Leif Granli until it was halted by the German occupants in July 1941. After the Second World War there was a merge with Communist controlled Hardanger Arbeiderblad from 1945 to 1949, when the cooperation ended, and Hardanger Folkeblad continued as a separate newspaper. The newspaper is issued three times a week. It had a circulation of 5,499 in 2008. Its editor is Trygve D. Syse.

Nils Nilsson Skaar was a Norwegian teacher, farmer, editor, and parliamentary representative from the Fykse Sound in the municipality of Kvam in Hordaland county.

Peder Carolus Jonsen Fylling, also known as Per Fylling, was a Norwegian folk material collector, book and antique collector, local historian, and author of cultural history books and articles.

Nils Tjoflot

Nils Ellingsson Tjoflot was a Norwegian violinist from Tjoflot in the municipality of Ullensvang in Norway's Hardanger district.

Rannveig Djønne is a Norwegian folk musician from Djønno in the municipality of Ullensvang, Norway. Djønne plays diatonic button accordion and is a graduate of the Ole Bull Academy in Voss.

Djønno Village in Western Norway, Norway

Djønno is a small village on the Oksen Peninsula in the municipality of Ullensvang in Norway's Hardanger district, in Hordaland county.

References

  1. Bibliotek og forskning årbok. Oslo: Norsk Bibliotekarlag. 1956. p. 17.
  2. 1 2 Helleve, Aslak T. "Thrond S Haukenæs". Norsk biografisk leksikon. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  3. Bergens billedgalleri (1993). Blikk for bok: den norske bok gjennom 350 år. Bergen: Bergen offentlige bibliotek. p. 13.
  4. Grøvik, Ivar (1968). "Peder Fylling – ein føregangsmann". Tidsskrift for Sunnmøre historielag. 43-44.