Thrum

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Kirriemuir Town in Angus, Scotland

Kirriemuir, sometimes called Kirrie or the Wee Red Toon, is a burgh in Angus, Scotland. Its history reaches back to earliest recorded times, when it is thought to have been a major ecclesiastical centre. Later it was identified with witchcraft, and some older houses still feature a "witches stane" to ward off evil. In the 19th century, it was an important centre of the jute trade. The playwright J. M. Barrie was born and buried here, and a statue of Peter Pan stands in the town square.

River Coquet River in Northumberland, England

The River Coquet runs through the county of Northumberland, England, discharging into the North Sea on the east coast at Amble. It rises in the Cheviot Hills on the border between England and Scotland, and follows a winding course across the landscape. The upper reaches are bordered by the Otterburn Ranges military training ground, and are crossed by a number of bridges built in the 20th century. It passes a number of small villages and hamlets, and feeds one of the lakes created by extraction of gravel that form the Caistron Nature Reserve, before reaching the town of Rothbury, where it is crossed by a grade II listed bridge. Below the town is Thrum Mill, the restoration of which was featured on Channel 4 television.

Castlegar, British Columbia City in British Columbia, Canada

Castlegar is the second-largest community in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia, Canada. In the Selkirk Mountains, at the confluence of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers, it is a regional trade and transportation centre, with a local economy based on forestry, mining and tourism.

Mike Mills Multi-instrumentalist for American alternative rock band R.E.M.

Michael Edward Mills is an American multi-instrumentalist, singer, and composer who was a founding member of the alternative rock band R.E.M. Though known primarily as a bass guitarist, backing vocalist, and pianist, his musical repertoire also includes keyboards, guitar, percussion instruments and occasional lead vocals. He contributed to a majority of the band's musical compositions.

<i>Laid</i> (album) 1993 studio album by James

Laid is the fifth studio album by British rock band James. It was released on 27 September 1993, through Fontana Records. Following the departure of trumpeter Andy Diagram, the band toured the United States supporting Neil Young acoustically. After returning to the United Kingdom, they began writing for their next album. Enlisting Brian Eno, the band recorded over the course of six weeks at Real World Studios in Box, England, and The Windings in Wrexham, Wales. The sessions also resulted in the experimental sixth studio album Wah Wah (1994). The album featured a more stripped-down sound than their past releases, inspired by the stint with Young.

Crispian Mills English rock musician and film director

Crispian Mills is an English singer-songwriter, guitarist, and film director. Active since 1988, Mills is best known as the frontman of the psychedelic indie rock band Kula Shaker. Following the band's break-up in 1999, he remained with Columbia Records, and toured with a set of session musicians under the name Pi, although no official studio recordings were released in full. After the label rejected the Pi album, Mills disappeared for a short time, returning in 2002 as frontman and lead guitarist for back-to-basics rock outfit The Jeevas, who disbanded in 2005 to make way for a reformed Kula Shaker, who released their third album Strangefolk in 2007. 2010 he released the album Pilgrims Progress with Kula Shaker. In 2017 the band celebrated the 20th anniversary of their album K with the release of the new record K 2.0. Mills joined the band for a sold-out UK tour to celebrate the anniversary.

A supergene is a chromosomal region encompassing multiple neighboring genes that are inherited together because of close genetic linkage, i.e. much less recombination than would normally be expected. This mode of inheritance can be due to genomic rearrangements between supergene variants.

Irving Harold Mills was an American music publisher, musician, lyricist, and jazz artist promoter. He sometimes used the pseudonyms Goody Goodwin and Joe Primrose.

Rug hooking

Rug hooking is both an art and a craft where rugs are made by pulling loops of yarn or fabric through a stiff woven base such as burlap, linen, or rug warp. The loops are pulled through the backing material by using a crochet-type hook mounted in a handle for leverage. In contrast latch-hooking uses a hinged hook to form a knotted pile from short, pre-cut pieces of yarn.

Mills is the plural form of mill, but may also refer to:

The Ting Tings

The Ting Tings are an English indie pop duo from Salford, Greater Manchester formed in 2007. The band consists of Katie White and Jules De Martino.

<i>Thrums Hawaiian Annual</i>

Thrum's Hawaiian Annual is a statistical compendium of Hawaiiana ranging from Hawaiian mythology to Hawaiian language to sites of interest in Hawaii, published by Star-Bulletin Printing Co.. The original research was compiled by antiquarian bookman Thomas George Thrum and first published in 1875 as The Hawaiian Annual and Almanac. Contributors to Thrum's Hawaiian Annual include the artist Bessie Wheeler.

Thrum Hall was a rugby league stadium on Hanson Lane in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England. It was the home of Halifax for 112 years. The site on which the ground stood is now occupied by a supermarket.

A b-boy is a person devoted to breaking or break dancing.

<i>Blue Jacket</i> (clipper)

The Blue Jacket was an 1854 medium clipper well known for the lavish decoration of the staterooms and saloon. She served in the Liverpool and Australia trades. The ship was named after the blue jackets, a traditional name for sailors in the US and British navies.

Thrum are an indie rock band from Bellshill, Lanarkshire, Scotland, formed in 1992. They released four singles and an album before splitting up in 1995. Singer Monica Queen went on to a solo career. Since 2011, Thrum have reformed, releasing a single and album and undertaking a number of live appearances.

Cecil Brown (Hawaii politician) American attorney, politician, businessman, and banker

Cecil Brown was an American attorney, politician, businessman, and banker in the Kingdom, Republic, and Territory of Hawaii.

Sovereignty Restoration Day Hawaiian national holiday

Sovereignty Restoration Day is a national holiday of the former Hawaiian Kingdom celebrated on July 31 and still commemorated by Native Hawaiians in the state of Hawaii. It honors the restoration of sovereignty to the kingdom, following the occupation of Hawaiʻi by Great Britain during the 1843 Paulet Affair, by British Rear-Admiral Richard Darton Thomas and when King Kamehameha III uttered the phrase: Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ʻĀina i ka Pono.

The Thrum Mill is a grade II-listed water mill in Rothbury, Northumberland, England. The water mill dates back to 1665.