Thrumpton

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Thrumpton
Church of All Saints, Thrumpton - geograph.org.uk - 739617.jpg
Church of All Saints, Thrumpton
Nottinghamshire UK location map.svg
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Thrumpton
Location within Nottinghamshire
Population165 (2011)
OS grid reference SK516309
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town NOTTINGHAM
Postcode district NG11
Dialling code 0115
Police Nottinghamshire
Fire Nottinghamshire
Ambulance East Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Nottinghamshire
52°52′N1°14′W / 52.87°N 1.24°W / 52.87; -1.24 Coordinates: 52°52′N1°14′W / 52.87°N 1.24°W / 52.87; -1.24

Thrumpton is a village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England. At the time of the 2001 census it had a population of 152, [1] increasing to 165 at the 2011 census. [2] It is located on the A453 road 6 miles south-west of West Bridgford. The 13th century Church of All Saints is Grade II* listed and was restored in 1871. [3] Many of the gabled brick houses in the village were built between 1700 and 1745 by John Emerton of Thrumpton Hall. [4]

Houses at Thrumpton - geograph.org.uk - 14907.jpg

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References

  1. "Area: Thrumpton CP (Parish)"
  2. "Civil parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 16 April 2016.
  3. Historic England. "Church of All Saints (1242423)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  4. Pevsner, Nikolaus. 1979. The Buildings of England:Nottinghamshire. pp 353–354.Harmondsworth, Middx. Penguin.

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