Thruway

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Thruway may refer to:

Amtrak Thruway Motorcoach Intercity coach company

Thruway Motorcoach is Amtrak's system of Amtrak-owned intercity coaches, locally contracted transit buses, through-ticketed local bus routes, and taxi services to connect Amtrak train stations to areas not served by its railroads, or stations which are disconnected temporarily due to service delays or track maintenance issues. Train and Thruway Motorcoach tickets are purchased together from Amtrak for the length of a passenger's journey, and the connections are timed for convenient dedicated and guaranteed-reliable transfers between the two services. In addition to providing connecting service to unserved areas, some Thruway Motorcoaches operate as redundant service along well-established passenger rail corridors to add extra capacity.

The New York State Thruway is a system of controlled-access highways spanning 569.83 miles (917.05 km) within the U.S. state of New York. It is operated by the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA), a New York State public-benefit corporation. The 496.00-mile (798.23 km) mainline is a toll road that extends from the New York City line at Yonkers to the Pennsylvania state line at Ripley by way of Albany, Syracuse, and Buffalo. According to the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association, the Thruway is the fifth busiest toll road in the United States.

Controlled-access highway Highway designed exclusively for high-speed vehicular traffic, with all traffic flow and ingress/egress regulated

A controlled-access highway is a type of highway that has been designed for high-speed vehicular traffic, with all traffic flow ingress- and egress-regulated. Common English terms are freeway, motorway and expressway. Other similar terms include Interstate and thruway and parkway. Some of these may be limited-access highways, although this term can also refer to a class of highway with somewhat less isolation from other traffic.

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Interstate 87 (I-87) is a 333.49-mile-long (536.70 km) north–south Interstate Highway located entirely within the U.S. state of New York, and is most of the main highway between New York City and Montreal. The highway begins in the New York City borough of the Bronx, just north of the Triborough Bridge. From there, the route runs northward through the Hudson Valley, the Capital District, and the easternmost part of the North Country to the Canadian border in the Town of Champlain. At its north end, I-87 continues into Quebec as Autoroute 15 (A-15). I-87 connects with several regionally important roads: I-95 in New York City, New York State Route 17 near Harriman, I-84 near Newburgh, and I-90 in Albany. The route is the longest intrastate Interstate Highway in the Interstate Highway System. The highway is not contiguous with I-87 in North Carolina.

Interstate 690 (I-690) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway that extends for 14.19 miles (22.84 km) through the vicinity of Syracuse, New York, in the United States. It is a spur of I-90 that travels southeast from Thruway exit 39 in Van Buren to I-481 in DeWitt. In between, I-690 passes through the western suburbs of Syracuse before heading east through the city itself, where it meets I-81 in downtown Syracuse. The expressway continues northwest of the Thruway as New York State Route 690 (NY 690).

Interstate 790 (I-790) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway in the city of Utica, New York, in the United States. It runs for 2.29 miles (3.69 km) from an interchange with New York State Route 5A (NY 5A) and NY 5S in downtown Utica to a pair of interchanges with Genesee Street east of the city. All of I-790 is concurrent with NY 5, and the portion south of NY 49 is also concurrent with NY 8 and NY 12. I-790 connects to exit 31 of the New York State Thruway (I-90) by way of an interchange near its east end. According to the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), I-790 follows NY 5 to Genesee Street while the highway leading to Thruway exit 31 is merely a pair of ramps connecting I-790 to its parent. The north–south portion of I-790 between its western terminus and NY 49 is named the North–South Arterial Highway.

Interstate 287 (I-287) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway in the US states of New Jersey and New York. It is a partial beltway around New York City, serving the northern half of New Jersey and the counties of Rockland and Westchester in New York. I-287, which is signed north–south in New Jersey and east–west in New York, follows a roughly horseshoe-shaped route from the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) in Edison Township, New Jersey, clockwise to the New England Thruway (I-95) in Rye, New York, for 98.72 miles (158.87 km). Through New Jersey, I-287 runs west from its southern terminus in Edison through suburban areas. In Bridgewater Township, the freeway takes a more northeasterly course, paralleled by U.S. Route 202 (US 202). The northernmost part of I-287 in New Jersey passes through mountainous surroundings. After crossing into New York at Suffern, I-287 turns east on the New York State Thruway (I-87) and runs though Rockland County. After crossing the Hudson River on the Tappan Zee Bridge, I-287 splits from I-87 near Tarrytown and continues east through Westchester County on the Cross-Westchester Expressway until it reaches the New England Thruway.

Orlando Health/Amtrak station railway station in Orlando, Florida

Orlando Health/Amtrak station, also known as Orlando station, is a train station in Orlando, Florida. It is served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system of the United States, and SunRail, the commuter rail service of Greater Orlando, as well as local and intercity buses. It serves Amtrak's Silver Meteor and Silver Star lines. Built in 1926, the historic station is located approximately one mile south of Downtown Orlando near the campus of Orlando Health. Serving 160,442 passengers at last measure in 2013, The station is Amtrak's fifth busiest in the Southeastern United States; it is the second busiest Amtrak station in Florida, behind the Sanford station of the Auto Train.

Amtrak California

Amtrak California is a brand name used by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) Division of Rail on three state-supported Amtrak rail routes within the US State of California, the Capitol Corridor, the Pacific Surfliner, and the San Joaquin. It also includes an extensive network of Thruway Motorcoach bus connections, operated by private companies under contract. The three lines shared the use of "Amtrak California" branded Thruway buses and trainsets.

The New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA) is a public benefit corporation in New York State, United States. The NYSTA was formed in 1950 with the responsibility of constructing, maintaining, and operating the New York State Thruway, a system of limited-access highways within the state.

Emeryville station Amtrak station in Emeryville, California, United States

Emeryville is an Amtrak station in Emeryville, California, United States. The station is served by the California Zephyr, Capitol Corridor, Coast Starlight, and San Joaquin. Amtrak Thruway Motorcoach buses connect all trains with downtown San Francisco.

Santa Cruz Metropolitan Transit District

Santa Cruz Metropolitan Transit District (SCMTD), or simply Santa Cruz METRO, provides bus service throughout Santa Cruz County, California.

Sacramento Valley Station United States national historic site

Sacramento Valley Station (SAC) is an Amtrak railway station in the city of Sacramento, California, at 401 I Street on the corner of Fifth Street. It is the seventh busiest Amtrak station in the country, and the second busiest in the Western United States with thousands of riders a day and over a million passengers per year. Today it is served by 38 daily Amtrak and Amtrak California trains and many Amtrak Thruway Motorcoaches. It is also the western terminus of the Sacramento RT Gold Line light rail system and the Route 30 bus serving Sacramento State University. A planned station for the Sacramento Streetcar is set to be at that location.

Transportation in New York is made up of some of the most extensive and one of the oldest transportation infrastructures in the country. Engineering difficulties because of the terrain of New York State and the unique issues of New York City brought on by urban crowding have had to be overcome since the state was young. Population expansion of the state generally followed the path of the early waterways, first the Hudson River and then the Erie Canal. Today, railroad lines and the New York State Thruway follow the same general route.

Oakland – Jack London Square station

Oakland – Jack London Square is a train station in Jack London Square of Oakland, California, United States. The station is served by Amtrak's Capitol Corridor, Coast Starlight, and San Joaquins trains. Through Thruway buses, this station is one of two that serves San Francisco, the other being Emeryville.

Martinez station railway station located in Martinez, California

Martinez is an Amtrak passenger train station in Martinez, California, United States, the county seat of Contra Costa County. The station was opened in September 2001, superseding a much earlier building that still stands a couple of blocks to the east. Prior to the creation of Amtrak on May 1, 1971, passenger service was provided by Southern Pacific Railroad. The station is served by local County Connection bus service and connecting service from WestCAT, and Tri-Delta Transit, as well as an Amtrak Thruway Bus Service. The station includes a transit center for buses, passenger drop off and pick-up zones, a taxi stand, and surface level car parking, reserved for use by train passengers only.

Numbered highways in New York highway system

The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) is responsible for the establishment and classification of a state highway network which includes Interstate Highways, U.S. Highways, and state routes. U.S. and Interstate Highways are classified as state routes in New York; however, a letter is suffixed to the number of the route. As a result, there is apparent duplication between U.S. Routes, Interstate Highways and state routes.

Carbondale station Amtrak station in the Illinois city

Carbondale is an Amtrak intercity train station in Carbondale, Illinois, United States, and is the southern terminus of Amtrak's Illini and Saluki routes. Carbondale is the southernmost Amtrak station in Illinois.

Interstate 90 (I-90) is a part of the Interstate Highway System that runs from Seattle, Washington, to Boston, Massachusetts. In the U.S. state of New York, I-90 extends 385.88 miles (621.01 km) from the Pennsylvania state line at Ripley to the Massachusetts state line at Canaan, and is the second-longest highway in the state after NY 17. Although most of the route is part of the tolled New York State Thruway, two non-tolled sections exist along I-90. Within New York, I-90 has a complete set of auxiliary Interstates, which means that there are interstates numbered I-190 through I-990 in the state, with no gaps in between. For most of its length in New York, I-90 runs parallel to the former Erie Canal route, New York State Route 5 (NY 5), U.S. Route 20 (US 20) and the CSX railroad mainline that traverses the state.

Longview station train station in Longview, Texas

Longview is a train station in Longview, Texas, United States. It is served by Amtrak and was originally built by the Texas & Pacific Railway.

The Highway 17 Express is an Amtrak Thruway Motorcoach route provided by a consortium of entities that provides regional service between San Jose and Santa Cruz County in the South Bay of the San Francisco Bay Area. The service is so called because it travels on California State Route 17. It is operated by the Santa Cruz Metropolitan Transit District.