Thryptomene cuspidata

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Thryptomene cuspidata
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Thryptomene
Species:
T. cuspidata
Binomial name
Thryptomene cuspidata
Synonyms [1]
  • Paryphantha cuspidataTurcz.
  • Thryptomene tenellaBenth. nom. illeg., nom. superfl.

Thryptomene cuspidata is a species of flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. It is a dense erect shrub that typically grows to a height of 0.6–2.2 m (2 ft 0 in–7 ft 3 in) and blooms between July and November producing white or pink flowers. [2]

The species was first formally described in 1852 by Nikolai Turczaninow and given the name Paryphantha cuspidata in the Bulletin de la classe physico-mathematique de l'Academie Imperiale des sciences de Saint-Petersburg. [3] [4] In 1985, John Green changed the name to Thryptomene cuspidata. [5]

Thryptomene cuspidata is found on plains and among granite outcrops in the Avon Wheatbelt, Coolgardie, Geraldton Sandplains and Mallee biogeographic regions in the south-west of Western Australia where it grows in sandy to gravelly soils. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Thryptomene cuspidata". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 12 May 2021.
  2. 1 2 "Thryptomene cuspidata". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  3. Turczaninow, Nikolai (1852). "Myrtaceae Xerocarpicae in Nova Hollandia a cl. Drummond lectae et plerumque in collectione ejus quinta distributae, determinatae et descriptae". Bulletin de la classe physico-mathématique de l'Académie Impériale des sciences de Saint-Pétersburg. 10: 321. Retrieved 12 May 2021.
  4. "Paryphantha cuspidata". APNI. Retrieved 12 May 2021.
  5. "Thryptomene cuspidata". APNI. Retrieved 12 May 2021.