Thubten Nyima Lungtok Tenzin Norbu

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Thubten Nyima Lungtok Tenzin Norbu (born 1928) is one of the previous Ganden Tripa (spiritual head of the Gelug Buddhists) - now known as Ganden Trisur. He was the 102nd holder of the position. [1] [2] Previously, he was the Changtse Chosje. He was born in 1928 into the Royal House of Matho, a cadet branch of the Royal Family of Ladakh. His father was Prince Phuntsog Namgyal, a direct descendant of the Kings of Ladakh. His mother, Tsering Lhazom, was from the aristocratic Leh Kalon family. He was the nephew of the 19th Bakula Rinpoche.

Ganden Tripa title of the spiritual leader of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism

The Ganden Tripa or Gaden Tripa is the title of the spiritual leader of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism, the school that controlled central Tibet from the mid-17th century until the 1950s. The 103rd Ganden Tripa, Jetsun Lobsang Tenzin died in office on 21 April 2017. Jangtse Choejey Kyabje Jetsun Lobsang Tenzin Palsangpo is the current Ganden Tripa.

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References

  1. "Kirti Monastery commemorates 600 years of religious service". Phayul. 6 May 2012. Retrieved 31 August 2016.
  2. "Gyalwang Karmapa Inaugurates Biography of His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama". Official Website of the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa. 26 October 2009. Retrieved 31 August 2016.