Thujopsis

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Thujopsis
Thujopsis dolabrata4.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Cupressaceae
Subfamily: Cupressoideae
Genus: Thujopsis
Species:
T. dolabrata
Binomial name
Thujopsis dolabrata

Thujopsis ( /θjˈɒpsɪs/ )[ citation needed ] is a genus of conifers in the cypress family (Cupressaceae), the sole member of which is Thujopsis dolabrata. It is endemic to Japan, where it is named asunaro (あすなろ). It is similar to the closely related genus Thuja (arborvitae), differing in the broader, thicker leaves and thick cones. It is also called hiba, [2] false arborvitae, or hiba arborvitae.

A popular allegory for the meaning behind asunaro is asu wa hinoki ni narou (明日はヒノキになろう), literally "tomorrow it will become a hinoki cypress", i.e. the tree looks like a smaller version of the common hinoki cypress.[ citation needed ] In Japan, other than being called asunaro, it also goes by the name hiba (ひば). There are also a few regional variations, with asunaro being called ate (貴, 阿天) in Ishikawa, and atebi on Sado island.[ citation needed ]

Thujopsis is a medium to large evergreen tree, reaching up to 40 m tall and 1.5 m trunk diameter, with red-brown bark which peels in vertical strips. The leaves are arranged in decussate pairs, scale-like, 3–10 mm long, glossy green above, and marked with vivid white stomatal bands below; they have a distinctive thick, almost fleshy texture. The seed cones are ovoid, 7–15 mm long and 6–10 mm diameter, with 6–12 thick scales, brown with a violet-white wax bloom when fresh.

There are two varieties:

Uses

The asunaro is a valued ornamental tree both in its native Japan, where it is commonly planted around temples as well as in gardens, and also in Europe and North America. In the latter two regions, planting is confined to areas with good rainfall or in gardens with reliable irrigation, as the species is not drought tolerant. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. [3] [4]

It is also used to a small extent in forestry in Japan, grown for the valuable wood, which is durable and scented, similar to that of Thuja plicata .

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<i>Microbiota decussata</i> Species of plant

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References

  1. Conifer Specialist Group (1998). "Thujopsis dolabrata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 1998. Retrieved 12 May 2006.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 23 October 2014. Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  3. "Thujopsis dolabrata AGM". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 14 July 2012.
  4. "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 102. Retrieved 23 December 2018.