Thukpa

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Thukpa
Thukpa, Tibetan noodle in Osaka, Japan.jpg
Type Soup
Region or state Tibet and Nepal
Associated national cuisine Nepal

Thukpa (Tibetan: ཐུག་པ ; Nepali : थुक्पा ; IPA: /tʰu(k̚)ˀ˥˥.pə˥˥/ ) is a Tibetan noodle soup, which originated in the eastern part of Tibet. Amdo thukpa (especially thenthuk ) is a famous variant among Tibetan people and Himalayan people of Nepal. The dish is also consumed in the region of Sikkim, Darjeeling, Kalimpong and Arunachal Pradesh in India. It is also popular in the Ladakh region and the state of Himachal Pradesh. Thukpa is also eaten in Bhutan, where it is a type of porridge. [1] There are numerous varieties of thukpa in Tibetan tradition, including:

Contents

Etymology

Thukpa has been described as a "generic Tibetan word for any soup or stew combined with noodles." [2]

Nepalese thukpa Nepalese Thuppa.jpg
Nepalese thukpa

Nepalese thukpa

The Nepalese version of thukpa is much influenced by Nepali tastes and therefore contains chili powder, masala (usually garam masala), which makes it hot and spicy with a dominant Nepali curry flavor.

See also

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Tibetan cuisine includes the culinary traditions and practices and its peoples. The cuisine reflects the Tibetan landscape of mountains and plateaus and includes influences from neighbours. It is known for its use of noodles, goat, yak, mutton, dumplings, cheese, butter, yoghurt and soups. Vegetarianism has been debated by religious practitioners since the 11th century, but is not prevalent due to the difficulty of growing vegetables, and cultural traditions promoting consumption of meat.

Nepalese cuisine culinary traditions of Nepal

Nepali/Nepalese cuisine comprises a variety of cuisines based upon ethnicity, soil and climate relating to Nepal's cultural diversity and geography. Dal-bhat-tarkari is eaten throughout Nepal. Dal is a soup made of lentils and spices, served over boiled grain, bhat—usually rice but sometimes another grain - and a vegetable curry, tarkari. Condiments are usually small amounts of spicy pickle which can be fresh or fermented, and radish known as 'mula ko achar', and of which there are a considerable number of varieties. Other accompaniments may be sliced lemon (nibuwa) or lime (kagati) with fresh green chilli and a fried papad. Dhindo (ढिंडो) is a traditional food of Nepal.

Immigration to Bhutan has an extensive history and has become one of the country's most contentious social, political, and legal issues. Since the twentieth century, Bhutanese immigration and citizenship laws have been promulgated as acts of the royal government, often by decree of the Druk Gyalpo on advice of the rest of government. Immigration policy and procedure are implemented by the Lhengye Zhungtshog Ministry of Home and Cultural Affairs, Department of Immigration. Bhutan's first modern laws regarding immigration and citizenship were the Bhutanese Citizenship Act 1958 and subsequent amendments in 1977. The 1958 Act was superseded by the Bhutanese Citizenship Act 1985, which was then supplemented by a further Immigration Act in 2007. The Constitution of 2008 included some changes in Bhutan's immigration laws, policy, and procedure, however prior law not inconsistent with the 2008 Constitution remained intact. Bhutan's modern citizenship laws and policies reinforce the institution of the Bhutanese monarchy, require familiarity and adherence to Ngalop social norms, and reflect the social impact of the most recent immigrant groups.

Bhutanese cuisine culinary traditions of Bhutan

Bhutanese cuisine employs much red rice, buckwheat, and increasingly maize. Buckwheat is eaten mainly in Bumthang, maize in the Eastern districts, and rice elsewhere. The diet in the hills also includes chicken, yak meat, dried beef, pork, pork fat, and lamb. Soups and stews of meat, rice, ferns, lentils, and dried vegetables, spiced with chili peppers and cheese, are a favorite meal during the cold seasons. Zow shungo is a rice dish mixed with leftover vegetables. Ema datshi is a spicy dish made with large, green chili peppers in a cheesy sauce, which might be called the national dish for its ubiquity and the pride that Bhutanese have for it. Other foods include jasha maru, phaksha paa, thukpa, bathup, and fried rice. Cheese made from cow's milk called datshi is never eaten raw, but used to make sauces. Zoedoe is another type of cheese made in the Eastern districts, which is added to soups. Zoedoe is normally greenish in color and has a strong smell. Other types of cheese include Western types like Cheddar and Gouda. Western cheese is made in the Swiss Cheese Factory in Bumthang or imported from India.

Tibetan dual system of government

The Dual System of Government is the traditional diarchal political system of Tibetan peoples whereby the Desi coexists with the spiritual authority of the realm, usually unified under a third single ruler. The actual distribution of power between institutions varied over time and location. The Tibetan term Cho-sid-nyi literally means "both Dharma and temporal," but may also be translated as "dual system of religion and politics."

Thukpa bhatuk

Thukpa bhatuk is a common Tibetan cuisine noodle soup that includes small bhasta noodles. This dish is a common soup made in the winter but is especially important for Tibetan New Year. On Nyi-Shu-Gu, the eve of Losar, the common Tibetan soup, Thukpa bhatuk is made with special ingredients to form Guthuk. Guthuk is then eaten on Losar to symbolise getting rid of negativities of the past year and invite positives into the new year.

References

  1. Girl, Druk (2019-07-16). "How to make Veg Thukpa in Easy Steps | Recipe". Druk Girl. Retrieved 2020-06-16.
  2. Boi, L.G.; Ltd, M.C.I.P. (2014). Asian Noodles. EBL-Schweitzer. Marshall Cavendish. p. 163. ISBN   978-981-4634-98-4.

2. Thukpa as a Porridge in Bhutan