Thukpa

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Thupka
Thukpa, Tibetan noodle in Osaka, Japan.jpg
Type Soup
Region or state Tibet and Nepal
Associated national cuisine Nepal

Thukpa (Tibetan: ཐུག་པ ; Nepali : थुक्पा ; IPA: /tʰu(k̚)ˀ˥˥.pə˥˥/ ) is a Tibetan noodle soup, which originated in the eastern part of Tibet. Amdo thukpa (especially thenthuk ) is a famous variant amongst the Tibetans and the people of Nepal. The dish is also consumed in the neighbouring state of Sikkim, the district of Darjeeling and in the Ladakh region of India. There are numerous varieties of thukpa in Tibetan tradition, including:

Contents

Etymology

Thukpa has been described as a "generic Tibetan word for any soup or stew combined with noodles." [1]

Nepalese thukpa Nepalese Thuppa.jpg
Nepalese thukpa

Nepalese thukpa

The Nepalese version of thukpa generally has spicier flavours involved that contains chili powder and masala (usually garam masala).

See also

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Tibetan cuisine

Tibetan cuisine includes the culinary traditions and practices and its peoples. The cuisine reflects the Tibetan landscape of mountains and plateaus and includes influences from neighbors. It is known for its use of noodles, goat, yak, mutton, dumplings, cheese, butter, yogurt, and soups. Vegetarianism has been debated by religious practitioners since the 11th century but is not prevalent due to the difficulty of growing vegetables, and cultural traditions promoting consumption of meat.

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Nepalese cuisine

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Bakso

Bakso or baso is an Indonesian meatball, or a meat paste made from beef surimi. Its texture is similar to the Chinese beef ball, fish ball, or pork ball. The word bakso may refer to a single meatball or the complete dish of meatball soup. Mie bakso refers to bakso served with yellow noodles and rice vermicelli, while bakso kuah refers to bakso soup served without noodles.

Bhutanese cuisine

Bhutanese cuisine employs much red rice, buckwheat, and increasingly maize. Buckwheat is eaten mainly in Bumthang, maize in the Eastern districts, and rice elsewhere. The diet in the hills also includes chicken, yak meat, dried beef, pork, pork fat, and lamb. Soups and stews of meat, rice, ferns, lentils, and dried vegetables, spiced with chili peppers and cheese, are a favorite meal during the cold seasons. Zow shungo is a rice dish mixed with leftover vegetables. Ema datshi is a spicy dish made with large, green chili peppers in a cheesy sauce, which might be called the national dish for its ubiquity and the pride that Bhutanese have for it. Other foods include jasha maru, phaksha paa, thukpa, bathup, and fried rice. Cheese made from cow's milk called datshi is never eaten raw, but used to make sauces. Zoedoe is another type of cheese made in the Eastern districts, which is added to soups. Zoedoe is normally greenish in color and has a strong smell. Other types of cheese include Western types like Cheddar and Gouda. Western cheese is made in the Swiss Cheese Factory in Bumthang or imported from India.

Culture of Darjeeling

The culture of Darjeeling, India, is quite diverse and unique. The two predominant religions are Hinduism and Vajrayana Buddhism. Dashain, Tihar, Buddha Jayanti, Christmas, Holi, Ram Navami, etc. are the main festivals. Besides, the diverse ethnic populace of the town also celebrates several local festivals. Buddhist ethnic groups such as the Lepchas, Bhutias, Sherpas, Yolmos, Gurungs, and Tamangs celebrate new year called Losar in January/February, Maghe Sankranti, Chotrul Duchen, and Tendong Lho Rumfaat. The Kiranti Rai people (Khambus) celebrate their annual Sakela festivals of Ubhauli and Udhauli. Deusi and Bhaileni are songs performed by men and women, respectively, during the festival of Tihar. All these provide a "regional distinctness" of Darjeeling's local culture from the rest of India. Darjeeling Carnival, initiated by a civil society movement known as The Darjeeling Initiative, was a ten-day carnival held yearly during winter that portrayed the rich musical and cultural heritage of Darjeeling Hills as its central theme. Every year, cultural festivals are held in the town of Darjeeling and its surrounding areas.

Rajma Red kidney beans dish, originating from the Indian subcontinent

Rājmā or Rāzmā is a vegetarian dish, originating from the Indian subcontinent, consisting of red kidney beans in a thick gravy with many Indian whole spices, and is usually served with rice. Although kidney beans did not originate from the Indian subcontinent, it is a part of regular diet in Northern India. The dish developed after the red kidney bean was brought to the Indian subcontinent from Mexico. A 100 gram serving of boiled Rajma beans contains about 140 calories, 5.7 grams of protein, 5.9 grams of fat and 18 grams of carbohydrate. Rajma chawal is kidney beans served with boiled rice.

Mixian (noodle)

Mixian is a type of rice noodle from the Yunnan Province, China. It is made from ordinary non-glutinous rice, and it is generally sold fresh rather than dried.

Guthuk

Guthuk is a noodle soup in Tibetan cuisine. It is eaten two days before Losar, the Tibetan New Year and is a variation on Thukpa bhatuk. The Tibetan religious ceremony 'Gutor' (དགུ་གཏོར་), literally meaning offering of the 29th, is held on the 29th of the 12th Tibetan month, and is focused on driving out all negativity, including evil spirits and misfortunes of the past year, and starting the new year in a peaceful and auspicious way. It is made with barley and other ingredients.

Nyi Shu Gu is the eve before the last day of the Tibetan year (29th). It is celebrated with various traditions leading up to the Tibetan New Year: Losar. Guthuk is a common Tibetan cuisine noodle soup that is associated with Nyi Shu Gu. Thukpa bhatuk is the common style of noodle soup that becomes Guthuk when eaten with special ingredients and elements on Nyi Shu Gu. Nyi Shu Gu is a time to cleanse and bid adieu to negativities, obstacles, uncleanliness and sickness. A fire is traditional as is washing up.

Thukpa bhatuk

Thukpa bhatuk is a common Tibetan cuisine noodle soup that includes small bhasta noodles. This dish is a common soup made in the winter but is especially important for Tibetan New Year. On Nyi-Shu-Gu, the eve of Losar, the common Tibetan soup, Thukpa bhatuk is made with special ingredients to form Guthuk. Guthuk is then eaten on Losar to symbolise getting rid of negativities of the past year and invite positives into the new year.

Kwati (soup)

Kwāti is a mixed soup of nine types of sprouted beans. It is a traditional Newari dish consumed on the festival of Guni Punhi, the full moon day of Gunlā which is the tenth month in the Nepal Era lunar calendar. Kwāti is eaten as a delicacy and for its health benefits and ritual significance. Kwati is known to be a healthy food. They say that it cures cold, cough and is one of the best foods for women in their maternity leave. Since it contains varieties of beans, this recipe is loaded with proteins and thus helps weak/sick people to regain their energy.

References

  1. Boi, L.G.; Ltd, M.C.I.P. (2014). Asian Noodles. EBL-Schweitzer. Marshall Cavendish. p. 163. ISBN   978-981-4634-98-4.

2. Thukpa as a Porridge in Bhutan