Thule Islands

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Thule Islands
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Thule Islands
Geography
Location Southern Atlantic Ocean
Coordinates 60°42′S45°37′W / 60.700°S 45.617°W / -60.700; -45.617 Coordinates: 60°42′S45°37′W / 60.700°S 45.617°W / -60.700; -45.617
Administration
Demographics
Population 0

The Thule Islands are a group of small islands and rocks lying 0.25 nautical miles (0.5 km) southwest of Balin Point in the northwestern part of Borge Bay, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. The name "Thule Rocks" was used as early as 1916, and appears to refer at least in part to this group. The Thule, one of the first floating factories to flense whales at sea, belonged to the Thule Whaling Company of Oslo. It operated in the South Orkney Islands in 1912–13 and 1913–14 and anchored on the east side of Signy Island during January 1913. The altered form of the name was recommended by the UK Antarctic Place-names Committee following a survey by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1947. [1] [2]

Balin Point is a headland which marks the north side of the entrance to Borge Bay on the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was charted by Discovery Investigations in 1933 and so named in association with Balin Rocks.

Borge Bay is a small bay between Balin Point and Berntsen Point on the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was charted in 1912 by Norwegian whaling captain Petter Sorlle, and named for Captain Hans Borge, master of the Polynesia, who undertook additional mapping of the bay during the following year.

Signy Island

Signy Island is a small subantarctic island in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was named by the Norwegian whaler Petter Sørlle after his wife Signy Therese.

Related Research Articles

Coronation Island island in South Orkney Islands

Coronation Island is the largest of the South Orkney Islands, 25 nautical miles (46 km) long and from 3 to 8 nautical miles wide. The island extends in a general east-west direction, is mainly ice-covered and comprises numerous bays, glaciers and peaks, the highest rising to 1,265 metres (4,150 ft).

Shagnasty Island

Shagnasty Island is a small, rocky ice-free island lying 0.3 miles (0.5 km) west of Lenton Point in the north part of Clowes Bay, close off the south coast of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. Roughly charted in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel, and surveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The name, applied by FIDS, arose from the unpleasant state of the island due to its occupation by a large colony of blue-eyed shags.

Express Cove is a small cove north of Foca Point on the west coast of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It has a very indented shoreline with numerous offshore islands and rocks. It was roughly charted in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel, and surveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for the American schooner Express, Thomas B. Lynch commanding, which visited the South Orkney Islands in 1880.

Laws Glacier

Laws Glacier is a confluent glacier system which flows into Marshall Bay on the south coast of Coronation Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It was surveyed in 1948–49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Richard M. Laws of the FIDS, leader and biologist at Signy Research Station in 1948 and 1949, and at South Georgia in 1951.

The Billie Rocks are a group of rocks 0.1 nautical miles (0.2 km) northeast of Drying Point, lying in Borge Bay along the east side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. The name "Billie Rock", for the easternmost rock of the group, appeared on a chart based upon a 1927 sketch survey of Borge Bay by Discovery Investigations personnel on the RRS Discovery. The name has since been extended to include the entire group.

Oliphant Islands

Oliphant Islands is a group of small ice-free islands and rocks lying south of Gourlay Peninsula, the southeast extremity of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. Dove Channel extends through this group in a general east-west direction. The group was roughly charted in 1912-13 by Petter Sorlle, Norwegian whaling captain, and again in 1933 by DI personnel. Surveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) and named by them for Professor Marcus L.E. Oliphant, then professor of physics, Birmingham University; later director of the Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, who gave assistance to the FIDS in obtaining equipment.

Jensen Ridge is a curving ridge running eastward from Foca Point toward Jane Col on Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. It was named in 1991 by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Captain Gullik Jensen, of the whaling ship Strombus from Tønsberg, Norway, who made the last whaling expedition to Signy Island in 1935–36.

The Jebsen Rocks are a chain of rocks which extend 0.5 nautical miles (1 km) in an east–west direction, lying 0.5 nautical miles north of Jebsen Point, off the west side of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. They were charted by Captain Petter Sorlle, a Norwegian whaler who made a running survey of the South Orkney Islands in 1912–13. The rocks are named in association with Jebsen Point.

Jane Peak is a conspicuous nunatak, 210 metres (700 ft) high, standing 0.5 nautical miles (1 km) west of the northern part of Borge Bay on Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands. It was roughly surveyed in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel, and resurveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey. It was named in 1954 by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for the brig Jane, James Weddell commanding, which visited the South Orkney Islands in 1822–23.

Deschampsia Point is a point on the northwest side of Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, 0.3 nautical miles (0.6 km) northeast of the Spindrift Rocks. It was descriptively named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1991, following British Antarctic Survey ecological research, after the Antarctic hair grass Deschampsia antarctica, which grows on the slopes near the point.

Moe Island island

Moe Island is an island 1 nautical mile (2 km) long in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica, separated from the south-west end of Signy Island by Fyr Channel. It was charted by Captain Petter Sørlle in 1912–13, and named after M. Thoralf Moe of Sandefjord, Norway, a contemporary whaling captain who worked in this area.

Foca Point is a rocky point forming the south side of the entrance to Express Cove on the west side of Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. It was surveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for the whale catcher Foca, belonging to the Compañía Argentina de Pesca, which visited the South Orkney Islands in December 1926.

Lovegrove Point is the north entrance point to Express Cove on the west side of Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, Antarctica. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Ian W. Lovegrove of the British Antarctic Survey. He was general assistant, Rothera Station, 1981–84 and Base Commander, Signy Island, summers 1984–89.

The Mirounga Flats are a small partially enclosed tidal area in the inner, northwestern corner of Borge Bay, Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. The area's eastern limit is formed by the Thule Islands; its northern and western limits by Signy Island. The tidal area dries at low water. The flats were roughly surveyed in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel, and were resurveyed in 1947 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The feature was so named by the FIDS because elephant seals are found there in large numbers during the moulting period.

McLeod Glacier (South Orkney Islands) glacier on Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands

McLeod Glacier is a glacier 1 nautical mile (2 km) long, flowing in a southeasterly direction into Clowes Bay on the south side of Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1954 for Michael McLeod, following a survey by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1947. On December 12, 1821, the cutter Beaufoy under McLeod sailed to a position at least 60 nautical miles (110 km) west of the South Orkney Islands, where a chart annotation indicates that land was sighted, possibly Coronation Island.

Matthews Island

Matthews Island is the largest of the Robertson Islands in the South Orkney Islands off Antarctica. It lies immediately south-east of Coronation Island, from which it is separated by a narrow channel known as the Divide. Matthews Island was mapped as part of Coronation Island until January 1957 when a Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) party established its insularity. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Drummond H. Matthews, a FIDS geologist at Signy Island in 1956.

Maling Peak is a mountain 430 metres (1,400 ft) high and is the southernmost of two conspicuous peaks 0.5 nautical miles (1 km) northwest of Cape Vik on the south coast of Coronation Island in the South Orkney Islands, Antarctica. It was roughly surveyed in 1933 by Discovery Investigations personnel and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Derek H. Maling, a Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey meteorologist at Signy Island in 1948 and 1949, who made a survey triangulation of Signy Island and the south coast of Coronation Island.

Skilling Island is a small island immediately north of Atriceps Island, in the Robertson Islands group of the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. Although roughly charted at a much earlier date, the island was first surveyed in 1933 by DI personnel. It was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for Charles J. Skilling (1931–52) of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), general assistant at Signy Island in 1949, and member of the sledge party which visited the Robertson Islands the same year. Skilling died aboard the John Biscoe on 17 April 1952.

Spirogyra Lake is a small lake 0.25 nautical miles (0.5 km) southeast of Thulla Point in the west part of Signy Island, South Orkney Islands. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC), 1981, after the algal genus Spirogyra, a species of which grows abundantly in this shallow lake in summer.

Light Lake is a small lake 0.2 nautical miles (0.4 km) east of Thulla Point, in western Signy Island, in the South Orkney Islands of Antarctica. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after British Antarctic Survey limnologist Jeremy J. Light, leader at Signy Island station, 1970–72.

References

  1. "Thule Islands". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2013-10-25.
  2. Alberts, Fred G., ed. (June 1995). Geographic Names of the Antarctic (PDF) (second ed.). United States Board on Geographic Names. p. 745. Retrieved 5 April 2012.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thule Islands" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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