Thuma Peak

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Thuma Peak is a mainly ice-free peak in the Desko Mountains, rising 2 miles (3 km) northwest of Overton Peak in southeast Rothschild Island. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Captain Jack S. Thuma, U.S. Coast Guard. [1]

The Desko Mountains are a west-northwest–east-southeast mountain range on Rothschild Island, off northwest Alexander Island. The mountain range spans 20 nautical miles (37 km) from Bates Peak to Overton Peak and rises to about 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) at Enigma Peak, Fournier Ridge.

Overton Peak is a peak in the Desko Mountains, rising to about 550 metres (1,800 ft) at the southeast end of Rothschild Island. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Commander Robert H. Overton, U.S. Coast Guard, Executive Officer, USCGC Westwind, U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze, 1971.

Rothschild Island

Rothschild Island is an island 39 kilometres (24 mi) long, mainly ice covered but surmounted by prominent peaks of Desko Mountains in Antarctica, 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of the north part of Alexander Island in the north entrance to Wilkins Sound.

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Filchner Mountains

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Wilson Hills is a group of scattered hills, nunataks and ridges that extend NW-SE for about 110 kilometres (68 mi) between Matusevich Glacier and Pryor Glacier in Antarctica. They were discovered by Lieutenant Harry Pennell, Royal Navy, on the Terra Nova Expedition in February 1911 during Robert Falcon Scott's last expedition, and named after Dr. Edward A. Wilson, a zoologist with the expedition, who perished with Scott on the return journey from the South Pole.

Morrill Peak is a sharp-pointed peak, about 550 metres (1,800 ft) high, in the Desko Mountains, rising 2 nautical miles (4 km) west-northwest of Thuma Peak in southeast Rothschild Island, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Captain Peter A. Morrill, U.S. Coast Guard, Executive Officer on USCGC Westwind in U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze 1967 and 1968.

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Celestial Peak is a granite peak, 1,280 metres (4,200 ft) high, 8 nautical miles (15 km) north of Mount Blowaway in the Wilson Hills. It was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey Topo West survey party, 1962–63, and named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1963–64, which occupied the peak as a survey and gravity station. So named by NZGSAE because the party's first observations of celestial stars were made nearby.

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Alyabiev Glacier glacier in Antarctica

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References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thuma Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

Coordinates: 69°40′S72°3′W / 69.667°S 72.050°W / -69.667; -72.050

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.