Thumb Rock

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Thumb Rock ( 65°15′S64°16′W / 65.250°S 64.267°W / -65.250; -64.267 Coordinates: 65°15′S64°16′W / 65.250°S 64.267°W / -65.250; -64.267 ) is a rock lying between Winter Island and the northwest end of Galindez Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago. Charted and named in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Winter Island island in the United States of America

Winter Island is an island connected by a causeway to Salem Neck in Salem, Massachusetts. It is about 45 acres (18 ha) in size, and is bounded by Smith Pool to the northwest, Cat Cove to the west, Salem Channel to the south and east, and Juniper Cove to the north. The island has about a dozen residences at the north end and one road, Winter Island Road. The Plummer Home for Boys sits on 18 acres (7.3 ha) of land on the northeastern shore. The balance of the island is Winter Island Marine Park. The entire island was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Winter Island Historic District and Archeological District in 1994.

Galindez Island

Galindez Island is an island 0.8 kilometres (0.5 mi) long, lying immediately east of Winter Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, who named it for Commander Ismael Galindez of the Argentine Navy, who was dispatched in the Uruguay to search for Charcot, when the expedition was feared lost early in 1905. The island was recharted by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Riddoch Rymill, 1934–37.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thumb Rock" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Arctic Archipelago Canadian archipelago

The Arctic Archipelago, also known as the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, is a group of islands north of the Canadian mainland.

Meek Channel

The Meek Channel is a strait separating Galindez Island from Grotto Island and Corner Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. It was charted in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, and named for William McC. Meek, marine architect and surveyor, who was of assistance in preparing the expedition ship Penola for the voyage.

Indicator Island is an island 0.16 km (0.1 mi) long, lying 0.16 km (0.1 mi) west of the northwest end of Galindez Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago, Antarctica. It was charted and named in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill. A windsock was erected on this island by the expedition to indicate wind direction for the expedition's airplane.

Argentine Islands group of islands in the Wilhelm Archipelago of Antarctica, 9 km SW of Petermann Island, 7 km NW of Cape Tuxen, Kiev Peninsula, Graham Land; discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition 1903–05; so named to thank Argentinas support to the expedition

The Argentine Islands are a group of islands in the Wilhelm Archipelago of Antarctica, situated 5 nautical miles (9 km) southwest of Petermann Island, and 4 nautical miles (7 km) northwest of Cape Tuxen on Kiev Peninsula in Graham Land. They were discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by him for the Argentine Republic in appreciation of that government's support of to his expedition.

Ambrose Rocks

The Ambrose Rocks are a small cluster of rocks situated southwest of the southern Argentine Islands and 1 nautical mile (2 km) northwest of the Gaunt Rocks, off the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. They were named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for David A. Ambrose, a survey assistant of the Hydrographic Survey Unit from HMS Endurance working in this area in February 1969.

Anvil Rock is a rock between Grotto Island and the southeast end of the Forge Islands in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago. It was charted and named in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Riddoch Rymill. The name is descriptive.

Bussey Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Bussey Glacier is a glacier flowing west from Mount Peary to the head of Waddington Bay on Kiev Peninsula on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first charted by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1908–10, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Group Captain John Bussey of the Directorate of Overseas Surveys.

The Buttons are two small islands lying 0.2 nautical miles (0.4 km) northwest of Galindez Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago. They were charted and named in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill.

Urchin Rock is a rock, over which the sea breaks, lying 2.3 nautical miles (4.3 km) west of the largest of the Berthelot Islands, off the west coast of Graham Land. First shown on an Argentine government chart of 1957. So named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 because the rock is a hazard on the edge of Grandidier Channel; an urchin is a roguish or mischievous boy.

Corner Rock is a rock lying about midway between Galindez Island and Corner Island at the southeast entrance to Meek Channel, in the Argentine Islands of the Wilhelm Archipelago. It was charted and named in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill.

The Frost Rocks are a cluster of rocks situated southwest of the southern Argentine Islands and 0.5 nautical miles (1 km) southwest of the Whiting Rocks, off the coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. They were named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Richard Frost, a survey assistant of the Hydrographic Survey Unit from HMS Endurance working in the area in February 1969.

Drum Rock is an insular rock in the Argentine Islands, Graham Coast, rising 6 metres (20 ft) above sea level on the eastern edge of the Forge Islands, between Smooth Island and Grotto Island. The name is descriptive of the shape of the rock and became established through local usage at the British Antarctic Survey Faraday Station during the 1980s.

Malpighi Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Malpighi Glacier is a glacier 5 nautical miles (9 km) long and 1 nautical mile (2 km) wide, draining southeast from the Harvey Heights in Stribog Mountains along Basarbovo Ridge to join Mackenzie Glacier and flow into Kayak Bay at the east coast of Brabant Island, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was first roughly charted by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache. The glacier was photographed by Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd in 1956–57, and mapped from these photos in 1959. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Marcello Malpighi, an Italian physiologist and pioneer histologist who first demonstrated the existence of the blood capillaries.

Saint Rita Point is a point terminating in a steep rock outcrop immediately north of the mouth of Gourdon Glacier, on the east coast of James Ross Island. The name "Cabo Santa Rita" appears on a 1959 Argentine map. Saint Rita (1381–1457), an Italian, was canonized in 1900 and is well known throughout the Spanish-speaking world as the saint of desperate causes.

Stella Creek is a narrow winding passage extending from Thumb Rock to the southeast end of Winter Island and lying between Winter Island and Galindez Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilheim Archipela. Charted in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) and named after the expedition motor boat Stella Polaris.

Stark Rock is a conspicuous rock lying 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south of Crulls Islands, in the Wilheim Archipelago. Mapped by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) from photos taken by Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd. in 1956-57. The name, given by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959, is descriptive.

Skua Creek is a narrow channel between Skua Island and Winter Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago. Charted and named Skua Inlet in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, but in recent years the name Skua Creek has overtaken the earlier name in usage.

Runciman Rock is a rock marked by breakers, lying 0.1 nautical miles (0.2 km) east of Black Island at the southeast approach to Black Island Channel in the Argentine Islands. Charted in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, who named it for Philip Runciman, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Whites Southampton Yachtbuilding and Engineering Company Limited, where the ship Penola was refitted before sailing south in 1934.