Thunder Glacier

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Thunder Glacier may refer to:

Thunder Glacier (Antarctica) glacier in Antarctica

Thunder Glacier is a through glacier, 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, which extends in an east-west direction across Wiencke Island between Sierra DuFief and the Wall Range, in the Palmer Archipelago. Probably known since the discovery of Wiencke Island by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition in 1898. Charted in 1944 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and so named by them because a survey party was nearly overwhelmed there by an avalanche.

Thunder Glacier (Mount Baker) glacier in the United States

Thunder Glacier is located on the west slopes of Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier descends to the west on the north side of the Black Buttes.

Thunder Glacier (Skagit County, Washington)

Thunder Glacier is located on the northeast slopes of Buckner Mountain, North Cascades National Park in the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier is approximately .10 mi (0.16 km) long and separated from the much larger Boston Glacier by an arete.

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Mount Baker mountain in Washington state, United States

Mount Baker, also known as Koma Kulshan or simply Kulshan, is an active glaciated andesitic stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc and the North Cascades of Washington in the United States. Mount Baker has the second-most thermally active crater in the Cascade Range after Mount Saint Helens. About 31 miles (50 km) due east of the city of Bellingham, Whatcom County, Mount Baker is the youngest volcano in the Mount Baker volcanic field. While volcanism has persisted here for some 1.5 million years, the current glaciated cone is likely no more than 140,000 years old, and possibly no older than 80–90,000 years. Older volcanic edifices have mostly eroded away due to glaciation.

Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

The Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Washington is a National Forest extending more than 140 miles (230 km) along the western slopes of the Cascade Range from the Canada–US border to the northern boundary of Mount Rainier National Park. Administered by the United States Forest Service, the forest is headquartered in Everett.

Icefall

An icefall is a portion of certain glaciers characterized by rapid flow and a chaotic crevassed surface. The term icefall is formed by analogy with the word waterfall, a similar, but much higher speed, phenomenon. When ice movement is faster than elsewhere, because the glacier bed steepens or narrows, the flow cannot be accommodated by plastic deformation and the ice fractures, forming crevasses. Where two fractures meet, seracs can be formed. When the movement of the ice slows down, the crevasses can coalesce, resulting in the surface of the glacier becoming smoother.

Serac

A serac is a block or column of glacial ice, often formed by intersecting crevasses on a glacier. Commonly house-sized or larger, they are dangerous to mountaineers, since they may topple with little warning. Even when stabilized by persistent cold weather, they can be an impediment to glacier travel.

State Route 542 (SR 542) is a 57.24-mile-long (92.12 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Washington, serving Mount Baker in Whatcom County. SR 542 travels east as the Mount Baker Highway from an interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5) in Bellingham through the Nooksack River valley to the Mt. Baker Ski Area at Austin Pass. It serves as the main highway to Mount Baker and the communities of Deming, Kendall, and Maple Falls along the Nooksack River. The highway was constructed in 1893 by Whatcom County as a wagon road between Bellingham and Maple Falls and was added to the state highway system as a branch of State Road 1 in 1925. The branch was transferred to Primary State Highway 1 (PSH 1) during its creation in 1937 and became SR 542 during the 1964 highway renumbering.

Glacier Peak Wilderness Wilderness area in the central Cascades of Washington state

Glacier Peak Wilderness is a 566,057-acre (229,075 ha), 35-mile-long (56 km), 20-mile-wide (32 km) wilderness area located within portions of Chelan, Snohomish, and Skagit counties in the North Cascades of Washington. The area lies within parts of Wenatchee National Forest and Mount Baker National Forest and is characterized by heavily forested stream courses, steep-sided valleys, and dramatic glacier-crowned peaks. The dominant geologic feature of the area is 10,541-foot (3,213 m) Glacier Peak. It is the most remote major volcanic peak in the Cascade Range and has more active glaciers than any other place in the lower forty-eight states. Glacier Peak is a volcanic cone of basalt, pumice, and ash which erupted during periods of heavy glaciation.

Boulder Glacier (Washington) glacier in Washington state, U.S.A.

Boulder Glacier is located on the southeast slope of Mount Baker, a stratovolcano near the Pacific coast of North America in the Cascade Range of Washington. Boulder Glacier is the sixth largest on Mount Baker with an area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2). It flows from the summit crater between Grant Peak and Sherman Peak to about 5,000 ft (1,500 m). It is noteworthy for retreating 1,610 ft (490 m) between 1987 and 2008, leaving newly exposed rock and soil behind.

Black Buttes landform

The Black Buttes, also known historically as the Sawtooth Rocks, make up an extinct stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc in Whatcom County, Washington, United States. Glacially eroded remnants of this volcano rise above the Deming Glacier, part of the glacier system of the nearby volcano Mount Baker. There are three major peaks — Colfax, Lincoln, and Seward — which can all be climbed.

Coleman Glacier (Washington) glacier in the United States

Coleman Glacier is located on Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Between 1850 and 1950, Coleman Glacier retreated 8,200 ft (2,500 m). During a cooler and wetter period from 1950 to 1979, the glacier advanced 2,480 ft (760 m) but between 1980 and 2006 retreated back 1,443 ft (440 m). Situated on the west slopes of Mount Baker, Coleman Glacier is bordered by the Roosevelt Glacier to the north and the Heliotrope Ridge to the south.

Mountaineers 5 Peak Pin

Mountaineers 5 Peak Pin is the name of a mountaineering challenge in Washington State, United States. The five peaks that make up the challenge, Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, Mount Baker, Mount Olympus, and Glacier Peak range from easy to moderate climbing difficulty. The highest peak of the Pin is Mount Rainier, and the least prominent is the heavily glaciated Mount Olympus. Expert Climbers like Jim Whittaker and Ed Viesturs pioneered the 5 peak Pin, which is now a popular first challenge for aspiring climbers.

Easton Glacier glacier in the United States

Easton Glacier is one of the more prominent alpine glaciers on Mount Baker in the North Cascades of Washington state, United States. Named for Charles F. Easton of Bellingham, who did much to preserve the history of Mount Baker, it is positioned on the south face of the mountain and flanked by Squak and Deming Glaciers.

Bastile Glacier glacier in the United States

Bastile Glacier is located on the north slopes of Mount Baker in the North Cascades, U.S. state of Washington.

Deming Glacier (Washington) glacier in the United States

Deming Glacier is located on Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Between 1850 and 1950, Deming Glacier retreated 7,217 ft (2,200 m). During a cooler and wetter period from 1950 to 1979, the glacier advanced 2,060 ft (630 m) but between 1980 and 2006 retreated back 1,140 ft (350 m). Situated on the southwest slopes of Mount Baker, Deming Glacier is bordered by the Easton Glacier to the east and the Black Buttes ridge to the west.

Hadley Glacier glacier in the United States

Hadley Glacier is located on Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Situated on the north slopes of Mount Baker, Hadley Glacier is north of Hadley Peak on a spur from Mount Baker.

Mazama Glacier (Mount Baker) glacier in the United States

Mazama Glacier is located on Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Between 1850 and 1950, Mazama Glacier retreated 7,700 ft (2,300 m). During a cooler and wetter period from 1950 to 1979, the glacier advanced 1,476 ft (450 m) but between 1980 and 2006 retreated back 1,509 ft (460 m). Situated on the north slopes of Mount Baker, Mazama Glacier is bordered by the Park Glacier to the south and Rainbow Glacier to the east.

Park Glacier glacier in the United States

Park Glacier is located on the northeast slopes of Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Park Glacier descends to the Park Cliffs along its eastern margin while the northern tongue of the glacier descends to nearly 4,500 ft (1,400 m) and is below Park Cliffs and Lava Divide. In the middle of its course, Park Glacier is connected to Rainbow Glacier to the north and Boulder Glacier to the south.

Roosevelt Glacier glacier in the United States

Roosevelt Glacier is located on the north slopes of Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. Roosevelt Glacier descends to nearly 5,000 ft (1,500 m) at Chromatic Moraine. In the middle of its course, Roosevelt Glacier is connected to Coleman Glacier to its south.

Sholes Glacier glacier in the United States

Sholes Glacier is located on the northeast slopes of Mount Baker in the North Cascades of the U.S. state of Washington. The glacier lies on the north side of the ridge known as The Portals. Between 1850 and 1950, Sholes Glacier retreated 3,838 ft (1,170 m). During a cooler and wetter period from 1950 to 1979, the glacier advanced 187 ft (57 m) but between 1980 and 2006 retreated back 278 ft (85 m).