Thunder Glacier (Antarctica)

Last updated
Thunder Glacier
Antarctica relief location map.jpg
Blue pog.svg
Location of Thunder in Antarctica
Location Palmer Archipelago
Coordinates 64°50′S63°24′W / 64.833°S 63.400°W / -64.833; -63.400
Length4 nmi (7 km; 5 mi)
Thicknessunknown
Statusunknown

Thunder Glacier ( 64°50′S63°24′W / 64.833°S 63.400°W / -64.833; -63.400 Coordinates: 64°50′S63°24′W / 64.833°S 63.400°W / -64.833; -63.400 ) is a through glacier, 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, which extends in an east-west direction across Wiencke Island between Sierra DuFief and the Wall Range, in the Palmer Archipelago. Probably known since the discovery of Wiencke Island by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition in 1898. Charted in 1944 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and so named by them because a survey party was nearly overwhelmed there by an avalanche.

See also

Related Research Articles

Usarp Mountains mountain range

The Usarp Mountains is a major Antarctic mountain range, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Welcome Mountain, Mount Van der Hoeven, Mount Weihaupt, Mount Stuart, Mount Lorius, Smith Bench, Mount Roberts, Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range.

Alice Creek is a cove forming the southernmost portion of Port Lockroy, Wiencke Island, in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by him for the wife of Édouard Lockroy, Vice President of the French Chamber of Deputies who assisted Charcot in obtaining government support for the expedition.

Apollo Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Apollo Glacier is a glacier, 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, flowing northeast and joining the lower part of Aphrodite Glacier 2 nautical miles (4 km) from the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Balch Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Balch Glacier is a glacier 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, on the east coast of Graham Land, flowing southeast into Mill Inlet, to the south of Gould Glacier.

Bayly Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Bayly Glacier is a glacier flowing into the head of Bancroft Bay, on the west coast of Graham Land. It was mapped by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) from photos taken by Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd in 1956–57, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1960 for Maurice B. Bayly, FIDS geologist at the Danco Island station in 1956 who, together with L. Harris, pioneered the route from the Portal Point hut to the plateau in February 1957.

Belgica Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Belgica Glacier is a glacier 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, flowing into Trooz Glacier to the east of Lancaster Hill on Kiev Peninsula, on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first charted by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, 1934–37, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 after the RV Belgica, the ship of the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Gerlache which explored this area in 1897–99.

Besnard Point is a headland which lies at the southeast side of Port Lockroy, Wiencke Island, and marks the east side of the entrance to Alice Creek, in the Palmer Archipelago. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named by him for A. Besnard, seaman on the expedition ship Français.

Casey Glacier is a glacier 6 nautical miles (11 km) wide, flowing east into Casey Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. It was discovered by Sir Hubert Wilkins on an aerial flight of December 20, 1928. Wilkins believed the feature to be a channel cutting completely across the Antarctic Peninsula, naming it Casey Channel after Rt. Hon. Richard G. Casey. Correlation of aerial photographs taken by Lincoln Ellsworth in 1935 and preliminary reports of the British Graham Land Expedition, 1934–37, led W.L.G. Joerg to interpret this glacier to be what Wilkins named Casey Channel. This interpretation is borne out by the results of subsequent exploration by members of the East Base of the United States Antarctic Service in 1940.

Channel Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Channel Glacier is a through glacier, 1.5 nautical miles (3 km), extending in an east-west direction across Wiencke Island, between Nipple Peak and Wall Range, in the Palmer Archipelago. It was discovered by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Gerlache 1897–99. The name appears on a chart based on a 1927 survey by DI personnel on the Discovery.

Vivaldi Glacier is a glacier lying between the Colbert Mountains and the Lully Foothills, flowing south from Purcell Snowfield into the head of Schubert Inlet on the west coast of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The feature appears to be first shown on maps of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) which photographed Alexander Island from the air in 1940. It was mapped from air photos obtained by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947–48, by Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960. Named "Vivaldi Gap" by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1961, after Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741), Venetian composer. The name was amended to Vivaldi Glacier following review of Landsat program imagery, 1979, displaying flow lines in the feature.

Nipple Peak is a 675 m (2,215 ft) peak standing 1.9 kilometres (1.2 mi) north-east of Channel Glacier in the northern part of Wiencke Island, in the Palmer Archipelago of Antarctica. It was discovered by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Adrien de Gerlache. The name, which suggests the shape of the feature, was given by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) who mapped the peak in 1944.

Wall Range is a mountain range, 3 nautical miles long in a NE-SW direction with steep wall-like cliffs and jagged peaks rising to 1,095 metres (3,593 ft), extending from Thunder Glacier to Channel Glacier in the center of Wiencke Island, in the Palmer Archipelago. First mapped by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache. Surveyed in 1944 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) and given this descriptive name.

Mount Wheat is a prominent mountain forming the highest point in Wall Range, rising immediately north of Thunder Glacier in the center of Wiencke Island, Palmer Archipelago. Probably first observed by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition which circumnavigated Wiencke Island in 1898. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Lieutenant Commander Luther William Wheat, U.S. Navy, helicopter commander with Squadron VXE-6, Operation Deepfreeze, 1975–78; Aviation Projects Manager, Division of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation, 1978; member, U.S. Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names, 1979-88.

Jougla Point headland

Jougla Point is a point forming the west side of the entrance to Alice Creek in Port Lockroy, lying on the west side of Wiencke Island, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was discovered and named by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, who considered it to be a peninsula. Because of its small size the term point is considered more appropriate.

Diplock Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Diplock Glacier is a narrow straight glacier, 10 miles (16 km) long, flowing eastward from Detroit Plateau, on Trinity Peninsula in Graham Land, into Prince Gustav Channel 5 miles (8 km) south of Alectoria Island. It is situated south of Marla Glacier and north of Zavera Snowfield. The feature was mapped from surveys by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (1960–61), and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Bramah Joseph Diplock, a British engineer who made considerable advances in the design of chain-track tractors (1885–1913).

Goudier Island is a small island with an appearance of bare, polished rock, lying 0.05 nautical miles (0.1 km) north of Jougla Point in the harbor of Port Lockroy, Wiencke Island, in the Palmer Archipelago. It was discovered by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, and named after E. Goudier, chief engineer of the expedition ship Français.

Harbour Glacier

Harbour Glacier is a through glacier 3 nautical miles (6 km) long and 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) wide, lying on the northwest side of Wiencke Island and extending in a northeast direction from Port Lockroy to the cove 1 nautical mile (2 km) east of Noble Peak, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was probably first seen by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition, 1897–99, under Gerlache. The glacier was charted in 1944 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, who so named it because of its proximity to the harbour of Port Lockroy.

Mitterling Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Mitterling Glacier is a glacier on the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica, draining between Mount Vartdal and Mount Hayes into the northern part of Mill Inlet. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after American historian Philip I. Mitterling, the author of America in the Antarctic to 1840.

Russell West Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Russell West Glacier is a glacier, 11 nautical miles (20 km) long and 4 nautical miles (7 km) wide, which lies immediately north of Detroit Plateau and flows from Mount Canicula, Verdikal Gap and Trajan Gate westward into Bone Bay on the north side of Trinity Peninsula. This glacier together with Russell East Glacier, which flows eastward into Prince Gustav Channel on the south side of Trinity Peninsula, form a through glacier across the north part of Antarctic Peninsula. It was first surveyed in 1946 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) for V.I. Russell, surveyor and leader of the FIDS base at Hope Bay in 1946.

Lécuyer Point is a point which forms the south side of the entrance to the harbor of Port Lockroy, Wiencke Island, in the Palmer Archipelago, Antarctica. It was discovered and named by the French Antarctic Expedition, 1903–05, under Jean-Baptiste Charcot.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thunder Glacier (Antarctica)" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg