Thure de Thulstrup

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Thure de Thulstrup Bror Thure Thulstrup - from Svenskt Portrattgalleri XX.png
Thure de Thulstrup
Grant from West Point to Appomattox, an 1885 lithograph by Thulstrup. Clockwise from lower left: Graduation from West Point (1843); In the tower at Chapultepec (1847); Drilling his Volunteers (1861); The Battle of Fort Donelson (1862); The Battle of Shiloh (1862); The Siege of Vicksburg (1863); The Chattanooga Campaign (1863); Appointment as Commander-in-Chief by Abraham Lincoln (1864); The Surrender of General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House (1865) Ulysses S. Grant from West Point to Appomattox.jpg
Grant from West Point to Appomattox, an 1885 lithograph by Thulstrup. Clockwise from lower left: Graduation from West Point (1843); In the tower at Chapultepec (1847); Drilling his Volunteers (1861); The Battle of Fort Donelson (1862); The Battle of Shiloh (1862); The Siege of Vicksburg (1863); The Chattanooga Campaign (1863); Appointment as Commander-in-Chief by Abraham Lincoln (1864); The Surrender of General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House (1865)
Allan Quatermain orders his men to fire, having waited until the last minute, an 1888 illustration for H. Rider Haggard's Maiwa's Revenge during its serial publication in Harper's Monthly Thure de Thulstrup - H. Rider Haggard - Maiwa's Revenge - Fire, you scoundrels.jpg
Allan Quatermain orders his men to fire, having waited until the last minute, an 1888 illustration for H. Rider Haggard's Maiwa's Revenge during its serial publication in Harper's Monthly

Thure de Thulstrup (April 5, 1848 – June 9, 1930), born Bror Thure Thulstrup in Sweden, [1] was a leading American illustrator with contributions for numerous magazines, including three decades of work for Harper's Weekly . [2] Thulstrup primarily illustrated historical military scenes.

<i>Harpers Weekly</i> American political magazine.

Harper's Weekly, A Journal of Civilization was an American political magazine based in New York City. Published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916, it featured foreign and domestic news, fiction, essays on many subjects, and humor, alongside illustrations. It carried extensive coverage of the American Civil War, including many illustrations of events from the war. During its most influential period, it was the forum of the political cartoonist Thomas Nast.

Contents

Background

Thulstrup was born in Stockholm, Sweden. [3] His father was Sweden's Secretary of the Navy amongst other such positions. [4] After graduating from the Royal Swedish Military Academy, [5] Thulstrup joined the Swedish military as an artillery officer at the age of twenty. However, he soon left Sweden for Paris, where he joined the French Foreign Legion and saw service in the Franco-Prussian War. [4] Thulstrup also served in the French part of Northern Africa as a member of the First Zouave Regiment. [5]

Swedish Navy naval branch of the Swedish Armed Forces

The Swedish Royal Navy is the naval branch of the Swedish Armed Forces. It is composed of surface and submarine naval units – the Royal Fleet – as well as marine units, the Amphibious Corps (Amfibiekåren).

The Royal Swedish Academy of War Sciences, founded 12 November 1796 by Gustaf Wilhelm af Tibell, is one of the Royal Academies in Sweden. The Academy is an independent organization and a forum for military and defense issues. Membership is limited to 160 chairs under the age of 62.

French Foreign Legion Military service branch of the French Army

The French Foreign Legion is a military service branch of the French Army established in 1831. Legionnaires are highly trained infantry soldiers and the Legion is unique in that it is open to foreign recruits willing to serve in the French Armed Forces. When it was founded, the French Foreign Legion was not unique; other foreign formations existed at the time in France. Commanded by French officers, it is open to French citizens, who amounted to 24% of the recruits in 2007. The Foreign Legion is today known as a unit whose training focuses on traditional military skills and on its strong esprit de corps, as its men come from different countries with different cultures. This is a way to strengthen them enough to work as a team. Consequently, training is often described as not only physically challenging, but also very stressful psychologically. French citizenship may be applied for after three years' service. The Legion is the only part of the French military that does not swear allegiance to France, but to the Foreign Legion itself. Any soldier who gets wounded during a battle for France can immediately apply to be a French citizen under a provision known as "Français par le sang versé". As of 2008, members come from 140 countries.

Career

After leaving the French Army, Thulstrup moved to Canada in 1872 to become a civil engineer. [5] He moved to the United States in 1873, [6] where he became an artist for the New York Daily Graphic, and, later, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper , documenting local events. [7] As his skills improved, he became able to move into more and more prestigious roles, including work for Century , Harper's Monthly , and Scribner's Magazine . [2] While living in New York, Thulstrup studied at the Art Students League. [6] His military pictures include a series of paintings depicting the American Civil War, and illustrations of a Virginian lifestyle in the middle of the eighteenth century. [5]

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

<i>Frank Leslies Illustrated Newspaper</i> American illustrated literary and news magazine

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, later renamed Leslie's Weekly, was an American illustrated literary and news magazine founded in 1855 and published until 1922. It was one of several magazines started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie.

<i>The Century Magazine</i> US publication 1880s-1930s

The Century Magazine was first published in the United States in 1881 by The Century Company of New York City, which had been bought in that year by Roswell Smith and renamed by him after the Century Association. It was the successor of Scribner's Monthly Magazine and ceased publication in 1930.

Thulstrup primarily illustrated historical military scenes, [3] [8] [9] and was praised by one of his publishers, Louis Prang, as "the foremost military artist in America", a sentiment echoed by other contemporary critics. [10] He also illustrated various other subjects. [8]

Louis Prang American printer

Louis Prang was an American printer, lithographer, publisher, and Georgist. He is sometimes known as the "father of the American Christmas card".

Personal life

Thulstrup married Lucie Bavoillot in 1879. [11] He died on June 9, 1930, [1] leaving behind no children, and no personal papers of his have survived. [4] Following his death, his illustrations have been labeled as "some of the most familiar scenes of American life now extant". [10]

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References

  1. 1 2 Hildebrand, Albin (1901). Svenskt porträttgalleri. 20. Tullberg.
  2. 1 2 Dictionary of Literary Biography (online edition), Thure de Thulstrup, p. 1.
  3. 1 2 The Swedish Pioneer Historical Quarterly. 13–14. Swedish Pioneer Historical Society. 1962.
  4. 1 2 3 Dictionary of Literary Biography (online ed.), Thure de Thulstrup, p. 2.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Swett Marden (2003). Little Visits with Great Americans or Success Ideals and How to Attain Them. Orison. Kessinger Publishing. p. 690. ISBN   978-0-7661-2727-2.
  6. 1 2 L. Larson, Judy (1984). American Illustration, 1890-1925: Romance, Adventure, & Suspense. Glenbow Museum. p. 142. ISBN   978-0-919224-47-6.
  7. Dictionary of Literary Biography (online ed.), Thure de Thulstrup, pp. 3–4.
  8. 1 2 Weitenkampf, F. (2008). American Graphic Art. Read Books. p. 194. ISBN   978-1-4437-8436-8.
  9. E. Neely, Mark; Holzer, Harold (2000). The Union Image: Popular Prints of the Civil War North. UNC Press. p. 222. ISBN   978-0-8078-2510-5.
  10. 1 2 Prang, Louis; Holzer, Harold (2001). Prang's Civil War Pictures: The Complete Battle Chromos of Louis Prang. North's Civil War. 16. Fordham University Press. p. 32. ISBN   978-0-8232-2118-9.
  11. Dictionary of Literary Biography (online ed.), Thure de Thulstrup, p. 5.

Further reading

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