Thurgood Marshall (disambiguation)

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Thurgood Marshall was the first African American to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States.

Thurgood Marshall Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court

Thurgood Marshall was an American lawyer, serving as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from October 1967 until October 1991. Marshall was the Court's 96th justice and its first African-American justice. Prior to his judicial service, he successfully argued several cases before the Supreme Court, including Brown v. Board of Education.

People and institutions etc. named after Thurgood Marshall are:

Thurgood Marshall Jr. American lawyer

Thurgood Marshall Jr. is an American lawyer and son of the late Supreme Court of the United States Justice Thurgood Marshall.

Thurgood Marshall College college of the University of California San Diego

Thurgood Marshall College (TMC) is one of the six undergraduate colleges at the University of California, San Diego. The college, named after Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American Supreme Court Justice and lawyer for the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education, emphasizes "scholarship, social responsibility and the belief that a liberal arts education must include an understanding of [one's] role in society." Marshall College's general education requirements emphasize the culture of community involvement and multiculturalism; accordingly Marshall houses the minors in Public Service and Film Studies for the campus. Significant academic programs and departments have come out of the college over many decades: Communication, Ethnic Studies, Third World Studies, African American Studies, Urban Studies & Planning, and Education Studies.

Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building

The Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building (TMFJB) houses offices that support the work of the United States Courts, including the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, the Federal Judicial Center, the United States Sentencing Commission, and the Office of the Clerk of the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation.

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