Thuringian Agricultural League

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The Thuringian Agricultural League (German : Thüringer Landbund) was a political party in Germany between 1920 and 1933. Part of the wider Agricultural League, it was often allied with the German National People's Party (DNVP).

German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol in Italy, the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

The Imperial Agricultural League or National Rural League was a German agrarian association during the Weimar Republic. It was led by landowners with property east of the Elbe and was allied with the German National People's Party.

German National Peoples Party political party

The German National People's Party was a national-conservative party in Germany during the time of the Weimar Republic. Before the rise of the Nazi Party, it was the major conservative and nationalist party in Weimar Germany. It was an alliance of nationalists, reactionary monarchists, völkisch and antisemitic elements supported by the Pan-German League.

History

Established in 1920, the party won 11 seats in the Thuringian Landtag in the elections that year, receiving 21% of the vote and becoming the second-largest party in the Landtag. Elections the following year saw the party reduced to 10 seats, although it remained the second-largest party.

Landtag of Thuringia parliament of the German state of Thuringia

The Landtag of Thuringia is the parliament of the German federal state of Thuringia. It convenes in Erfurt and currently consists of 91 members of five Parties. According to the free state's constitution, the primary functions of the Landtag are to pass laws, elect the Minister-President and control the government of Thuringia.

For the 1924 and 1927 state elections the party was part of the Thuringian Order League, an alliance with the DNVP and the German People's Party (DVP). The alliance won 48% of the vote in 1924, taking 35 of the 72 seats. Although the alliance's vote share was reduced to 34% in 1927, it remained the largest faction in the Landtag.

German Peoples Party German liberal political party

The German People's Party was a national liberal party in Weimar Germany and a successor to the National Liberal Party of the German Empire. A right-wing liberal or conservative-liberal party, its most famous member was Chancellor and Foreign Minister Gustav Stresemann, a 1926 Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

Running alone in the 1929 state elections, the party won nine seats, making it the second-largest party after the SPD. The party contested the November 1932 federal elections as part of an alliance with the DNVP and DVP. [1] It won a single seat, whilst the DNVP won 51 and the DVP 11. [1] In the same year it won six seats in the state elections.

Social Democratic Party of Germany Social-democratic political party in Germany

The Social Democratic Party of Germany, is a social-democratic political party in Germany.

November 1932 German federal election

Federal elections were held in Germany on 6 November 1932. They saw a four percent drop in votes for the Nazi Party and slight increases for the Communists and the national conservative DNVP. It was the last free and fair all-German election before the Nazi seizure of power on 30 January 1933, as the following elections of March 1933 were already accompanied by massive suppression, especially against Communist and Social Democratic politicians.

Together with the DNVP, the party did not contest the March 1933 elections, subsequently losing its seat in the Reichstag. [2]

March 1933 German federal election

Federal elections were held in Germany on 5 March 1933, after the Nazi seizure of power on 30 January and just six days after the Reichstag fire. Nazi stormtroopers had unleashed a widespread campaign of violence against the Communist Party (KPD), left-wingers, trade unionists, the Social Democratic Party of Germany, and the Centre Party. They were the last multi-party elections in a unified Germany until 1990.

Reichstag (Weimar Republic) legislative body of Weimar Germany

The Reichstag was the Lower house of the Weimar Republic's Legislature. It originated in the creation of the Weimar Constitution in 1919. After the end of the Weimar Republic in 1933, the Reichstag continued to operate, albeit sporadically, as the nominal Legislature of Nazi Germany.

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