Thuringian Cup

Last updated
Thuringia Cup
Deutschland Lage von Thuringen.svg
Founded1991
Region Thuringia, Germany
Qualifier for DFB-Pokal
Current champions Carl Zeiss Jena (2019–20)
Most successful club(s) Carl Zeiss Jena (11 titles)

The Thuringia Cup (German: Thüringenpokal) is an annual football competition in Thuringia, Germany. The Thuringia Football Association (German: Thüringer Fußball-Verband, TFV) is its governing body. The cup winner qualifies for next season's DFB-Pokal. It is one of the 21 regional cup competitions in Germany.

Contents

Qualification and competition format

All Thuringian clubs competing in 3. Liga, Regionalliga, NOFV-Oberliga Süd, Thüringenliga and Landesklasse Thüringen are eligible to play in the cup. Additionally the winners of the Bezirkspokal competitions qualify. Starting with the 2007–08 season only one team per club may participate.

Thecompetition consists of 6 rounds played in a knock-out format. There is only one match per round, if scores are level after 90 minutes, there is a 2x15 minutes extra time followed by a penalty shootout, if necessary. Fixtures are determined by a draw. Clubs from 3rd Liga and several other teams (determined by a draw) get a first-round bye.

Finals

The finals:

DateHost cityWinnerFinalistResult
1991 Gera SV 1910 Kahla FV Zeulenroda 4–3 after penalties
1992 Gotha FSV Wacker 90 Nordhausen FSV Wismut Gera 2–1
1993 Rudolstadt FC Carl Zeiss Jena II SV JENAer Glas 5–3 after penalties
1994 Waltershausen FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt 1. Suhler SV 4–0
1995 [1] Weida FC Carl Zeiss JenaFV Zeulenroda1–0
1996 Sondershausen FSV Wacker 90 Nordhausen FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt1–0
1997 Heldrungen FSV Wacker 90 NordhausenFC Rot-Weiß Erfurt3–2
1998 Bad Langensalza FC Rot-Weiß ErfurtFSV Wacker 90 Nordhausen4–1
1999 Suhl FC Carl Zeiss JenaFSV Wacker 90 Nordhausen3–1
2000 Erfurt FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt SSV Erfurt Nord 3–1
2001GeraFC Rot-Weiß ErfurtFC Carl Zeiss Jena2–0
2002GothaFC Rot-Weiß ErfurtFC Carl Zeiss Jena7–5 after penalties
2003GothaFC Rot-Weiß ErfurtFC Carl Zeiss Jena2–0 a.e.t.
2004 [2] GothaFC Carl Zeiss JenaFC Rot-Weiß Erfurt II5–3 after penalties
2005GeraFC Rot-Weiß Erfurt IIFC Carl Zeiss Jena7:6 after penalties
2006 [3] Meuselwitz FC Carl Zeiss Jena 1. FC Gera 03 4–2
2007 Pößneck 1. FC Gera 03FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt1–0
2008GeraFC Rot-Weiß Erfurt ZFC Meuselwitz 1–0 a.e.t.
2009ErfurtFC Rot-Weiß ErfurtFC Carl Zeiss Jena3–2
2010PößneckZFC MeuselwitzVfB 09 Pößneck2–0
2011 Heiligenstadt ZFC Meuselwitz1. SC Heiligenstadt6–5 pen
2012MeuselwitzFC Carl Zeiss JenaZFC Meuselwitz2–0
2013 Jena SV Schott JenaRot-Weiß Erfurt1–0
2014JenaFC Carl Zeiss JenaRot-Weiß Erfurt5–0
2015MeuselwitzFC Carl Zeiss JenaZFC Meuselwitz2–1 a.e.t.
2016JenaFC Carl Zeiss JenaFC Rot-Weiß Erfurt2–0
2017ErfurtFC Rot-Weiß Erfurt FSV Wacker 90 Nordhausen 1–0
2018ErfurtFC Carl Zeiss Jena Wismut Gera 5–0
2019ErfurtFSV Wacker 90 Nordhausen Preußen Bad Langensalza 5–0
2020JenaFC Carl Zeiss Jena FSV Martinroda 8–2

Records

Record winners are FC Carl Zeiss Jena, having won the title eleven times, followed by FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt (9).

The highest attendance record was set on 15 November 2005 in Erfurt. After rivals FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt and FC Carl Zeiss Jena had only met in the final in the preceding years, they met in the quarter-final of the 2005–06 season. Jena took home a 4–2 penalty shootout win in front of 11,000 spectators.

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References

  1. Since Jena was qualified for the cup on the strength of their Regionalliga Nord finish, FV Zeulenroda qualified for the 1995–96 DFB-Pokal season.
  2. Protesting the decision to hold the cup final only two days after a league match, Erfurt's players did not take part in the awards ceremony after the match. Because of this unsportsmanlike conduct the club's first team was banned from the 2004 competition and could not defend its title.
  3. Since Jena was qualified for the cup on the strength of their Regionalliga Nord finish, 1. FC Gera took part in the 2006–07 DFB-Pokal season.

Sources