Thurlo McCrady

Last updated
Thurlo McCrady
Biographical details
Born(1907-07-31)July 31, 1907
Coon Rapids, Iowa
DiedMay 27, 1999(1999-05-27) (aged 91)
Lake San Marcos, California
Playing career
Football
c. 1928 Hastings
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1932–1940 Hastings
1941–1946 South Dakota State
Basketball
1930s Hastings
1941–1947 South Dakota State
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
?–1941 Hastings
1941–1947 South Dakota State
1947–1951 Kansas State
1959–1967 AFL (asst. commissioner)
1967–1976 ABA (exec. dir.)
Head coaching record
Overall58–40–10 (football)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
6 NCAC (1932–1933, 1935–1937, 1940)

Thurlo E. "Mac" McCrady (July 31, 1907 – May 27, 1999) was an American football, basketball, and track coach, college athletics administrator, and professional sports executive. He served as the head football coach at Hastings College in Hastings, Nebraska from 1932 to 1940 and South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota from 1941 to 1946. McCrady was also the athletic director at South Dakota State fem 1941 to 1947 and Kansas State University from 1947 to 1951. He was the assistant commissioner of the American Football League (AFL) from 1959 to 1967 and executive director of the American Basketball Association (ABA) from 1967 to 1976.

Contents

McCrady graduated from Hasting in 1929 and earned a master's degree in physical education at the University of Southern California in 1940. He died on May 27, 1999, at his home in Lake San Marcos, California. [1]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Hastings Broncos (Nebraska College Athletic Conference)(1932–1940)
1932 Hastings5–2–14–0–1T–1st
1933 Hastings4–2–13–0–11st
1934 Hastings7–23–12nd
1935 Hastings6–43–11st
1936 Hastings8–14–01st
1937 Hastings6–2–12–0–11st
1938 Hastings5–3–22–1–13rd
1939 Hastings6–3–13–0–11st [n 1]
1940 Hastings4–4–13–0–1T–1st
Hastings:47–23–727–3–6
South Dakota State Jackrabbits (North Central Conference)(1941–1946)
1941 South Dakota State 2–51–57th
1942 South Dakota State 4–43–34th
1943 No team—World War II
1944 South Dakota State 1–1NANA
1945 South Dakota State 1–4–1NANA
1946 South Dakota State 3–3–22–1–23rd
South Dakota State:11–17–36–9–2
Total:58–40–10
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Notes

  1. The 1939 Nebraska College Athletic Conference title was declared vacant after the season because Hastings used an ineligible player. [2]

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References

  1. "Thurlo E. McCrady". The Manhattan Mercury . Manhattan, Kansas. May 30, 1999. p. 2. Retrieved July 2, 2020 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Hastings Not Grid Titlist". Beatrice Daily Sun. Beatrice, Nebraska. December 3, 1939. p. 12. Retrieved July 27, 2020 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .