Thurman Station Bridge

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Thurman Station Bridge
Thurman Station Bridge from Warrensburg.jpg
View from Warrensburg side
Coordinates 43°28′47″N73°49′6″W / 43.47972°N 73.81833°W / 43.47972; -73.81833 (Thurman Station Bridge) Coordinates: 43°28′47″N73°49′6″W / 43.47972°N 73.81833°W / 43.47972; -73.81833 (Thurman Station Bridge)
Carries2 traffic lanes of NY-418.svg NY 418
Crosses Hudson River
Locale Thurman, New York and Warrensburg, New York, New York
Official nameThurman Station Bridge
Maintained by New York State Department of Transportation
Characteristics
Design steel truss bridge [1]
History
Opened1941
USA New York location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location in New York

The Thurman Station Bridge is a two–lane bridge that carries NY 418 across the Hudson River connecting Thurman, New York with Warrensburg, New York. It was built in 1941. [2]

Hudson River river in New York State, draining into the Atlantic at New York City

The Hudson River is a 315-mile (507 km) river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States. The river originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York, flows southward through the Hudson Valley to the Upper New York Bay between New York City and Jersey City. It eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean at New York Harbor. The river serves as a political boundary between the states of New Jersey and New York at its southern end. Further north, it marks local boundaries between several New York counties. The lower half of the river is a tidal estuary, deeper than the body of water into which it flows, occupying the Hudson Fjord, an inlet which formed during the most recent period of North American glaciation, estimated at 26,000 to 13,300 years ago. Tidal waters influence the Hudson's flow from as far north as the city of Troy.

Thurman, New York Town in New York, United States

Thurman is a town in the western part of Warren County, New York, United States. It is part of the Glens Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town population was 1,199 at the 2000 census. The town is named after John Thurman, an early landowner. The town lies entirely inside the Adirondack Park.

Warrensburg, New York Town in New York, United States

Warrensburg is a town in Warren County, New York, United States. It is centrally located in the county, west of Lake George. It is part of the Glens Falls metropolitan area. The town population was 4,255 at the 2000 census. While the county is named after General Joseph Warren, the town is named after James Warren, a prominent early settler. U.S. Route 9 passes through the town, which is immediately west of Interstate 87.

See also

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