Thurmond House (Siloam Springs, Arkansas)

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Thurmond House
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Location 407 Britt, Siloam Springs, Arkansas
Coordinates 36°10′57″N94°32′3″W / 36.18250°N 94.53417°W / 36.18250; -94.53417 Coordinates: 36°10′57″N94°32′3″W / 36.18250°N 94.53417°W / 36.18250; -94.53417
Area less than one acre
Built 1910 (1910)
MPS Benton County MRA
NRHP reference # 87002430 [1]
Added to NRHP January 28, 1988

The Thurmond House is a historic house at 407 Britt in Siloam Springs, Arkansas. It is an American Foursquare wood frame house, 2-1/2 stories in height with a wide hip roof. It is finished in novelty siding, with distinctive corner boards topped by capitals. A single-story porch, with a concrete base and piers, extends across the width of the front facade. The second level has a small central window flanked by trios of narrow one-over-one sash; there is a hip-roof dormer in the roof. Built c. 1910, the house is typical of many Foursquare houses built around that time, but is set off by its porch and corner boards. [2]

Siloam Springs, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Siloam Springs is a city in Benton County, Arkansas, United States. The city shares a border on the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line with the city of West Siloam Springs, Oklahoma, which is within the Cherokee Nation territory. The town was founded in 1882 and was characterized by the purported healing powers of the spring water feeding Sager Creek and trading with nearby Native American tribes. John Brown University (JBU) was founded in 1919 as a private, interdenominational, Christian liberal arts college in the city. Today, Siloam Springs is known for its efforts to preserve and revitalize the city's historic downtown and as a promoter of the arts via Sager Creek Arts Center and the JBU art gallery. The community is located on the western edge of the growing Northwest Arkansas metropolitan area and has had a population increase of 47% to 15,039 between the 2000 and 2010 censuses.

American Foursquare

The American Foursquare or American Four Square is an American house style popular from the mid-1890s to the late 1930s. A reaction to the ornate and mass-produced elements of the Victorian and other Revival styles popular throughout the last half of the 19th century, the American Foursquare was plain, often incorporating handcrafted "honest" woodwork. This style incorporates elements of the Prairie School and the Craftsman styles. It is also sometimes called Transitional Period.

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Benton County, Arkansas Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Benton County, Arkansas.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Thurmond House" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2015-03-12.