Thurso East

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Thurso Castle Thurso Castle - geograph.org.uk - 574325.jpg
Thurso Castle

Thurso East (alternatively, the North Shore) is a coastline section of the Atlantic 0.5 miles (0.80 km) east of Thurso, [1] Caithness, northern Scotland. [2] It is situated at the mouth of the River Thurso, overlooked by the remains of Thurso Castle. The reef is made of layers of Caithness flagstone (the same stone that paves the Strand and much of Paris). It is Scotland's prime surfing venue on the north coast.

Atlantic Ocean Ocean between Europe, Africa and the Americas

The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest of the world's oceans, with an area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers. It covers approximately 20 percent of Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World".

Thurso town in Caithness, Scotland

Thurso is a town and former burgh on the north coast of the Highland council area of Scotland. Situated in the historical area of Caithness, it is the northernmost town on the British mainland.

Caithness Historic county in Scotland

Caithness is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area of Scotland.

Contents

Surfing

Thurso East is a fast reef break and has hosted many international competitions. [3] The reef holds swell from 2 feet (0.61 m) upwards of 15 feet (4.6 m) and is primarily a long walling right-hander [4] with several barrel sections depending on tide and swell direction. Thurso East came into the spotlight in 2006 when it was used to host the inaugural O'Neill Highland Open WQS surfing competition. [5] The event was won by British surfer Russell Winter. From 2006-2011 O’Neill sponsored an international surf contest at this location which was latterly called the Coldwater Classic and the event regularly attracted big name surfers. [6] In 2012 O'Neill announced that it wouldn't be renewing their sponsorship deal, in order to direct resources elsewhere. [7]

Russell Winter is a British professional surfer and avid coasteerer. The highlight of his career so far has been gaining a place on the ASP World Championship Tour.

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References

  1. Anderson, William; Robertson, Joseph; Brichan, James Brodie; McNab, John (1855). Origines Parochiales Scotiae: pt. 1. Diocese of Argyle. Diocese of the Isles (Public domain ed.). W.H. Lizars. pp. 754–.
  2. Sumpter, Rod (2004). 100 Best Surf Spots in the World: The World's Best Breaks for Surfers in Search of the Perfect Wave. Globe Pequot Press. pp. 108–. ISBN   978-0-7627-2598-4.
  3. Cox, Roger (14 October 2012). "It's ridden the crest of a wave for a while, but it's the end of an era for the Thurso Coldwater Classic". The Scotsman. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  4. "Thurso East, Scotland". Beach Wizard. Archived from the original on 7 October 2009. Retrieved 17 October 2009.
  5. "Surfers praise Scotland the wave". BBC News. 26 April 2006. Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  6. Cox, Roger (16 November 2013). "Thurso still boasts world-class waves". The Scotsman. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  7. Clark, Will (15 February 2012). "Major blow as surfing contest is wiped out". John O'Groat Journal. Retrieved 1 June 2014.

See also

Glossary of surfing

Coordinates: 58°35′57″N3°30′37″W / 58.59917°N 3.51028°W / 58.59917; -3.51028

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.